Dec 05, 2019  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin

Courses of Instruction


Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix. Each course description begins with a subject prefix followed by a three-digit course number and the course title. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description. Prerequisites and co-requisites are also listed. A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student will be permitted to enroll in the course. A co-requisite is a course, experience, or other preparation that must be completed at the same time that the student is enrolled in the listed course.

Please note, when searching courses by “Code or Number”, an asterisk (*) can be used to return mass results. For instance, a “Code or Number” search of ” 1* ” can be entered, returning all 100-level courses.

 

Communication Studies

  
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    COMS 390 - Communication, Leadership, and Society


    3 credit hours
    Analysis of leadership and followership as communication phenomena. Application of leadership principles in a variety of contemporary social and business contexts.
  
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    COMS 410 - Environmental Communication


    3 credit hours
    Effect of communication on how the natural world is perceived. Contexts, styles, and strategies of communication about the environment examined from a rhetorical perspective. Prerequisite(s): COMS 101  (or 102 ).
  
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    COMS 420 - Interpersonal Conflict Management


    3 credit hours
    Principles of effective communication and conflict engagement. Conflict strategies employed in interaction and techniques to increase awareness of power and emotion in conflict.
  
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    COMS 430 - Argumentation and Debate


    3 credit hours
    An introduction to theories, techniques, and styles of debate with a focus on understanding the role of ethics in argumentation. Includes opportunities to analyze and perform argumentation and debates in a variety of contexts including interpersonal, community, and political. Prerequisite(s): COMS 101  (or 102 ) and 140 
  
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    COMS 435 - Social Movement Rhetoric


    3 credit hours
    Survey and criticism of the rhetoric of social movements throughout U.S. history: abolition; women’s suffrage, including 2nd Wave Feminism; 20th century civil rights, and the contemporary LGBT rights movement.   Prerequisite(s): Grade of “C” or higher in COMS 101  (or 102 ), and ENG 102  (or 104 ).
  
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    COMS 445 - Communication Training and Development


    3 credit hours
    Strategies and techniques for improving communication skills of business personnel, students, and clients.
  
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    COMS 450 - Rhetorical Criticism


    3 credit hours
    A survey and practice of rhetorical methods and criticism through analysis of speeches, campaigns, and other rhetorical artifacts. Prerequisite(s): COMS 101  (or 102 ), and ENG 102  (or 104 ).
  
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    COMS 460 - Seminar in Communication Studies


    3 credit hours
    Special offerings on a Communication Studies topic not covered in the curriculum.  May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite(s): COMS 101  (or 102 ).
  
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    COMS 475 - Internship in Communication Studies


    1-6 credit hours
    Practical experience in a professional environment. Applications, including requirements, are available in departmental office. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours. Graded Pass/Fail. Open to juniors and seniors only with departmental and Academic Advisor consent.
  
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    COMS 491 - Directed Studies in Communication Studies


    1-3 credit hours
    Supervised, directed study in communication-related area. Faculty advisor must approve research topic the semester prior to registration. Consent of instructor required.
  
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    COMS 495 - Public Relations Campaigns


    3 credit hours
    Review of current strategic communication management practices related to planning, proposing, implementing, and analyzing public relations campaigns. Application of theory and research strategies to current problems and needs of organizations. Class format is primarily discussion and team projects, including case study analyses and service learning projects. Prerequisite(s): COMS 220   or instructor consent. 
  
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    COMS 499 - Senior Seminar in Communication Studies


    3 credit hours
    Communication Studies capstone experience. Presentation of senior projects that demonstrate how coursework in the COMS program contributes to the understanding of research, theory, and practice in the field of communication studies. Required of all COMS majors. Offered in fall term only. Prerequisite(s): COMS 299 . Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Computer Informatics

  
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    INFM 171 - Social Informatics


    3 credit hours
    Introduction to key social research perspectives and literature on the use of information and communication technologies. Covers current topics such as information ethics, relevant legal frameworks, popular and controversial uses of technology e.g. peer-to-peer file sharing, digital divides, etc.  
  
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    INFM 241 - Introduction to Informatics and Computing


    3 credit hours
    An introduction to the program development and design process, including computer-based concepts of problem solving, structured programming logic and techniques, algorithm development and program design. Topics include program flowcharting, algorithms, input/output techniques, looping, modules, selection structures, file handling, control breaks, pseudocoding, and user documentation. 
  
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    INFM 242 - Logical Foundations for Informatics


    3 credit hours
    An introduction to methods of analytical, abstract, and critical thinking; deductive reasoning; and logical and mathematical tools used in information sciences. The topics include propositional and predicate logic, natural deduction proof system, sets, functions and relations, proof methods in mathematics, mathematical induction, and graph theory.  Prerequisite(s): MATH 147 .
  
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    INFM 245 - Computer Programming I


    3 credit hours
    Basic programming abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return, values), basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays, and an introduction to defining objects. Prerequisite(s): INFM 241 .
  
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    INFM 246 - Computer Programming II


    3 credit hours
    Continuation of Computer Programming I. Advanced programming concepts including inheritance and composition, binary and text I/O, GUI and event-driven programming, introduction to design patterns, multi-threaded programming, network programming, and testing. Prerequisite(s): INFM 241 ,INFM 242   and INFM 245 .
  
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    INFM 347 - Human Computer Interaction


    3 credit hours
    Students will learn the fundamental theories of human-computer interaction (HCI) and user-centered design. This course is both a survey of HCI research and an introduction to the psychological, behavioral, and other social science knowledge and techniques relevant to the design of interactive and ubiquitous computing systems. Recommended PSYC 201 .
  
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    INFM 348 - Information Representation


    3 credit hours
    The course is designed to develop skills in the design and implementation of databases using relational database management systems (RDBMS). Emphasis is on the practical aspects of database design and development. Topics include conceptual design of database systems using the entity-relationship (ER) model, logical design and normalization, physical design, and the relational database model with SQL as a language for creating and manipulating database objects. XML technologies for metadata representations.  Prerequisite(s): INFM 241 , INFM 242 , and INFM 245  . 
  
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    INFM 349 - Informatics Project Management


    3 credit hours
    This course will cover breaking down a complex project into manageable segments, leading a diverse project team, and using effective tools to ensure that the project meets its deliverables and is completed within budget and on schedule. Students will complete a plan for a project, giving them valuable experience with the relevant tools and skills, including Microsoft Project software. Recommended course: MG 361 .
  
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    INFM 350 - Database and Applications Security


    3 credit hours
    Aspects of information security will be addressed. Topics include security implications of databases, telecommunication systems, risk assessment, security policies, remote connections, authentication and prevention systems, foundations of cryptography, physical security issues, and appropriate countermeasures.  Prerequisite(s): INFM 241 , INFM 242 , INFM 245   and INFM 348 .
  
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    INFM 370 - Data Structures and Algorithms I


    3 credit hours
    Introduction to fundamental data structures and algorithms to solve computational problems.  Emphasis on quantitative performance analysis of the various approaches along with applications.  Topics include lists, queues, stacks, sorting (insertion, merge, quick), search trees (binary, red-black), and hash tables (separate chaining, probing).

    Part I of two part course:  Part I covers fundamentals, sorting, and searching, Part II covers graphs, strings, and advanced applications. Prerequisite(s): INFM 241 , INFM 242 , INFM 245  and INFM 246  

  
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    INFM 371 - Data Structures and Algorithms II


    3 credit hours
    Continuation of Part I.  Emphasis on graph and string processing.  Topics include graph representation, breadth-first and depth-first search, minimum spanning trees (Prim, Kruskal), shortest paths (Dijkstra, Bellman-Ford), substring search, regular expressions, and data compression.  Other topics include event-driven simulation, B-trees, maximum flow, and an introduction to intractability.

      Prerequisite(s): INFM 241 , INFM 242 , INFM 245 , and INFM 370 . Co-requisite(s): INFM 246  

  
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    INFM 409 - Internship in Informatics


    3 credit hours
    Work-related experience in a private, public or governmental organization enhancing student learning of academic concepts and theories in Informatics. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours on a pass/fail basis. Junior standing, GPA of 2.5 in major, and consent of insturctor.
  
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    INFM 410 - Internship in Informatics II


    3 credit hours
    Work-related experience in a private, public or governmental organization enhancing student learning of academic concepts and theories in Informatics. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours on a pass/fail basis. Junior standing, GPA of 2.5 in major, and consent of insturctor. 
  
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    INFM 450 - Data Analysis and Mining I


    3 credit hours
    Introduction to fundamental concepts of data mining, hands-on experience in data collection, preprocessing, analysis, clustering and prediction.  Prerequisite(s): INFM 241 , INFM 242 , INFM 245  , and INFM 348 .
  
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    INFM 451 - Data Analysis and Mining II


    3 credit hours
    Continuation of INFM 450. Predictive models (e.g. decision trees, logistic SVM Bayes, nearest neighbors), model evaluation techniques, clustering (hierarchical, density-based), basic association analysis, and anomaly detection. Data visualization/exploration. Hands-on projects.  Prerequisite(s): INFM 241 , INFM 242 , INFM 245  , INFM 348 , and INFM 450 . Co-requisite(s): INFM 246 , INFM 371 .
  
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    INFM 455 - Information Infrastructure I


    3 credit hours
    Examination of software architecture and the concepts and procedures of applications development. Course topics include the setup and implementation of the open source XAMPP cross-platform web server solution stack. Students will acquire skills for building online shopping sites, implementing use authentication and authorization, and managing a large volume of content through a relational database.  Prerequisite(s): INFM 241 , INFM 242 , INFM 345 , and INFM 348 .
  
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    INFM 456 - Information Infrastructure II


    3 credit hours
    Advanced Java programming concepts and tools for electronic commerce and enterprise applications. Servlets, Java server pages, and XML for web server systems. Enterprise JavaBeans for session and entity management. Client side applets, JDBC database manipulation, security, and other advanced topics. Prerequisite(s): INFM 241 , INFM 242 , INFM 345 , INFM 348 , INFM 455 .
  
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    INFM 460 - Special Topics in Informatics


    3 credit hours
    A study of a special topic in Informatics. May repeat once for a total of 6 credit hours. Senior standing (or consent of instructor).
  
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    INFM 476 - Applied Research in Informatics


    3 credit hours
    Directed research in Informatics.  May be repeated once for a total of 6 credit hours. Restricted to senior standing (or consent of instructor).

Computer Science

  
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    CS 161 - Introduction to Computer Science


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    An introduction to computational thinking, problem solving and the fundamental ideas of computer science through programming in a scripting language (Python, Ruby, etc.). Topics include algorithms, abstraction and modeling the syntax and semantics of high-level language; fundamental concepts and data structures, including simple containers (arrays, lists, strings and dictionaries); basic software development methods and tools; documentation and style; introduction to object-oriented programming; exceptions and error handling; graphical user interfaces and even driven programming; recursion; introduction to algorithm analysis and run-time efficiency.  Prerequisite(s): MATH 131  or Mathematics ACT minimum subscore of 20 or SAT minimum subscore of 444.
  
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    CS 185 - Survey of Computer Science


    1 credit hour
    This course provides an overview of the nature of computer science, in both a historical and modern context, and its relationship to other disciplines. Students will learn about what computer scientists do and why, and will hear a variety of speakers discuss career opportunities in computer science and related disciplines.  Grade Pass/Fail.
  
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    CS 210 - Introduction to Object Oriented Programming


    3 credit hours
    Fundamental concepts in object-oriented programming language (Java, Python, C++, Visual Basic .NET and Ruby). Principles of program design, algorithm development, definition and use of classes along with the fundamentals of object-oriented design. Other topics include an overview of programming language principles, simple analysis of algorithms, basic searching and sorting techniques, and an introduction to software engineering issues. - Brief review of control structures, functions, and primitive data types - Object-oriented programming: Object-oriented design; encapsulation and information-hiding; separation of behavior and implementation; classes, subclasses, and inheritance; polymorphism; class hierarchies - Fundamental computing algorithms: simple searching and sorting algorithms (linear and binary search, selection and insertion sort) - Fundamentals of event-driven programming - Machine level representation of data: Bits, bytes, and words; numeric data representation and number bases; representation of character data - Introduction to computer graphics: Using a simple graphics API - Memory management - Overview of programming languages: History of programming languages; brief survey of programming paradigms - Introduction to language translation: Comparison of interpreters and compilers; language translation phases; machine-dependent and machine-independent aspects of translation. Prerequisite(s): CS 161   with a grade of C or higher.
  
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    CS 222 - Algorithm Development


    3 credit hours
    Studies data abstractions (e.g., stacks, queues, lists, trees) and their representation techniques (e.g., linking, arrays). Introduces concepts used in algorithm design and analysis including criteria for selecting data structures to fit their applications.  Prerequisite(s): CS 210  grade of C or higher.
  
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    CS 250 - Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science


    3
    Logic, infinity, and induction; applications include undecidability and stable marriage problem. Modular arithmetic and GCDs; applications include primality testing and cryptography. Polynomials; examples include error correcting codes and interpolation. Probability including sample spaces, independence, random variables, law of large numbers; examples include load balancing, existence arguments, Bayesian inference.  Prerequisite(s): CS 161   grade of C or higher.
  
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    CS 295 - Special Topics in Computer Science


    3 credit hours
    Topic will be announced prior to registration. Topics vary. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Repeatable up to 9 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 161  .
  
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    CS 310 - Data Structures


    3 credit hours
    Covers advanced data structures, computational geometry, cryptography, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, graph algorithms (e.g., depth-first search), network algorithms (e.g., shortest paths), approximation algorithms. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 222 .
  
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    CS 311 - Object Oriented Design


    3 credit hours
    A continuation of CS 210  and emphasizes concepts of object-oriented software design (OOD). Topics include recursion, inheritance, generics, class design, container classes, user interfaces, design patterns, and frameworks for reflection, parallelism, and networking.  Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 210  .
  
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    CS 322 - Algorithm Development and Data Structures


    3 credit hours
    Fundamental programming concepts are presented together with supporting theoretical foundations and practical applications. This course emphasizes the practical application of techniques for writing and analyzing programs: data abstraction, program verification, and performance analysis. These techniques are applied in the design and analysis of fundamental algorithms and data structures. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 310 .
  
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    CS 330 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis


    3 credit hours
    Covers development, computer implementation, and analysis of numerical methods for applied mathematical problems. Topics include floating point arithmetic, numerical solution of linear systems of equations, root finding, numerical interpolation, differentiation, and integration. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 250  and MATH 171 .
  
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    CS 340 - Human Centered Computing Foundations


    3 credit hours
    Introduces the practice and research of human-centered computing, including the evolution of human-computer interaction to its forms today and the techniques of user-centered design. The course will survey topics that include social computing; tangible computing; mobility; and more. It will cover computing in society at large with respect to domains such as health, education, assistive technology, emergency response, and environment.  Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 161 .
  
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    CS 364 - Web Development


    3 credit hours
    Covers languages, tools, and techniques for developing interactive and dynamic web pages. Topics include page styling, design, and layout; client and server side scripting; web security; and interacting with data sources such as databases.  Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 210 .
  
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    CS 375 - Programming for Mobile Devices


    3 credit hours
    This course will introduce the students to the third wave of computing, mobile programming. It will also expose the students to the various constraints in programming for mobile devices while incorporating networking and security in their programs. Students will typically be using the .NET Compact Framework or Java Mobile Edition. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 311 .
  
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    CS 395 - Special Topics in Computer Science


    3 credit hours
    Topic will be announced prior to registration. Topics vary. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 161 .
  
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    CS 420 - Computer and Video Game Development


    3 credit hours
    This course examines computer and video game development. Topics include computer programming, structured and object-oriented design, even-driven designs, and simulation and user interface design. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 311 .
  
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    CS 484 - Senior Seminar I


    3 credit hours
    In this course, students begin an interdisciplinary project in Computer Science related to their minor/second major.  Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 322 .
  
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    CS 485 - Senior Seminar II


    3 credit hours
    Students will complete an interdisciplinary project in Computer Science related to their minor/second major. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in CS 484 .

Economics

  
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    EC 231 - Introduction to Macroeconomics


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    Basic economic concepts, aggregate income, employment and output, money and banking, inflation, monetary and fiscal policy, and international economics and comparative systems.
  
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    EC 232 - Introduction to Microeconomics


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    An explanation of the market determination of and the individual household’s response to demand, supply, and price in both product and factor markets.
  
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    EC 307 - World Economy


    3 credit hours
    Focuses on financial factors-interest rates, inflation, exchange rates, the balance of payments-related to international trade, and their role in the formulation of national economic policy. Includes an examination of the theoretical basis for trade between countries, the existence of trade barriers, and the effects of U.S. trade policy on the multinational corporation. Prerequisite(s): EC 231  and 232 , and junior standing.
  
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    EC 401 - Money and Banking


    3 credit hours
    The functions of money, credit, and financial institutions in our economy. Details the structure of interest rates and investigates the determination of the level of domestic rates of interest and their implications for international currency markets. (Cross-listed with FI 401 .)
  
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    EC 460 - Special Topics in Economics


    3 credit hours
    Study of selected topic in economics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours if topic is different. Junior standing required. Prerequisite(s): EC 231  and 232 

Education

  
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    ED 201 - Explorations in Education


    1 credit hour
    Observation of classrooms, case studies, and critical reading and reflection will provide students with a foundation for making professional career decisions regarding teaching. Note: This course is designed to acquaint dually enrolled high school students with the education profession as part of a cooperative agreement between the University of Montevallo and local school districts that offer career-technical education, Future Teachers Association opportunities, or teaching academies. Enrollment is restricted to dually enrolled high school students.
  
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    ED 401 - Introduction to Teaching


    1 credit hour
    Designed to acquaint pre-professionals with the education profession. Observation of classrooms and case analyses will provide students a beginning pedagogical foundation for making professional career decisions regarding teaching. Restricted to majors in Elementary Education, Elementary/Collaborative Education, or Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Co-requisite(s): EDF 330, EDF 375, SPED 408, ED 481, EXNS 480
  
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    ED 402 - Secondary Students as Learners


    2 credit hours
    The COE conceptual framework theme, “Educator as Developing Professional,” is a major organizer for this course in that secondary candidates will be encouraged to explore various foundations for beginning a career in teaching and for committing to anticipated growth and development to span the entire career.
  
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    ED 407 - Current Trends in Teaching Exceptional and Diverse Learners


    2 credit hours
    This course explores methods and strategies to prepare teacher candidates to teach exceptional and diverse learners in the modern classroom. Methods and strategies include academic, behavioral, and social instructional best practices within the fields of special education, culturally-responsive pedagogy/teaching, and multicultural education. Prerequisite(s): Current admission to the University of Montevallo secondary education program. (Cross-listed with ED 507).
  
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    ED 410 - Teaching of Reading


    3 credit hours
    This course will provide prospective candidates with the knowledge of learner, knowledge of subject matter, curriculum and instruction, of the competencies and materials needed to teach reading to children from varying backgrounds of experience in the elementary classroom setting. This course is intended to impart: a) knowledge of reading skills; b) understanding of the reading process as one of the integrated language arts; c) competencies and attitudes for teaching reading; d) knowledge of different approaches and materials used in teaching reading; e) knowledge of objectives in the Alabama Course of Study and the Alabama Reading Initiative; and f) the discovery of the beginning of a personal literacy framework for teaching reading. The specific purpose of this course is to present an eclectic approach to the teaching of reading.
  
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    ED 411 - Teaching of Reading II


    3 credit hours
    Approaches, methods, strategies, and materials necessary to effectively teach and assess literature-based reading for children in early childhood, elementary and middle school settings. Teaching and assessing literature-based reading, and planning formats needed to teach these strategies. Admission to TEP required. Prerequisite(s): ED 410 , ED 447 , ED 465 , EDF 461 , and SPED 415 . Co-requisite(s): ED 444 , ED 445 , ED 446 ED 448 .
  
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    ED 418 - Classroom Management


    3 credit hours
    Provides an opportunity to review and analyze various classroom environments and disciplinary styles. Students will develop basic human-relations skills and communicate an understanding of their role in the classroom. (Cross-listed with ED 518).
  
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    ED 427 - Technology-Based Instructional Strategies


    2 credit hours
    General Education Course
    This course discusses Web-based applications, software, and hardware used within a classroom setting, as well as instructional strategies to help pre-service teachers begin to understand the link between classroom instruction and technology. (Cross-listed with ED 527).
  
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    ED 435 - Teaching Foreign Language at the Secondary Level


    1 credit hour
    Field-based methods with certified teacher in students’ teaching field.
  
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    ED 441 - Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences at the Secondary Level


    1 credit hour
    Field-based methods with certified teacher in students’ teaching field.
  
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    ED 444 - Methods and Materials for Teaching Social Studies


    3 credit hours
    Curricular approaches, teaching strategies, and resources for effective teaching of social studies at the early childhood, elementary, and middle school levels. Particular emphasis is given to content knowledge and methodology in history, geography, civics, and economics. The pre-service teacher’s development as a decision-maker is emphasized; a laboratory experience is required. Admission to TEP required. Prerequisite(s): ED 410 , ED 447 , ED 465 , EDF 461 , and SPED 415 . Co-requisite(s): ED 411 , ED 445 , ED 446 , and ED 448 .
  
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    ED 445 - Methods and Materials for Teaching Mathematics


    3 credit hours
    Materials and methods of teaching mathematics to children in early childhood, elementary, and middle school settings. The primary focus of the course is on the instructional decisions made by teachers as facilitators of mathematics learning in the classroom. Appropriate laboratory experiences provided. Admission to TEP required. Prerequisite(s): ED 410 , ED 447 , ED 465 , EDF 461  and SPED 415 . Co-requisite(s): ED 411 , ED 444 , ED 446  and ED 448 . (Cross-listed with ED 545).
  
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    ED 446 - Methods and Materials for Teaching Language Arts


    3 credit hours
    Selection of strategies and construction of language arts materials for children in early childhood, elementary and middle school settings in teaching language arts across the curriculum. Appropriate laboratory experiences are required. Admission to TEP required. Prerequisite(s): ED 410 , ED 447 , ED 465 , EDF 461  and SPED 415 . Prerequisite(s) with concurrency allowed: ED 411 , ED 444 , ED 445  and ED 448 . (Cross-listed with ED 546).
  
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    ED 447 - Technology for Today’s Classroom


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    Researching, designing, and producing integrated, discipline-specific multimedia products for classroom instruction. Admission to TEP required. Prerequisite(s): ED 410 , ED 481 , EDF 330 , EDF 375 , SPED 407  and EXNS 480 . Co-requisite(s): Elementary Education: ED 410 , ED 465 , EDF 461 , and SPED 415 .   Elementary/Collaborative Education: ED 410 , EDF 461 , and SPED 415 .  (Cross-listed with ED 547).
  
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    ED 448 - Methods and Materials for Teaching Science


    3 credit hours
    Materials and methods of teaching science for children in early childhood and elementary settings. Scientific literacy, content knowledge, and the application of pedagogical content knowledge are the major components of this course. Admission to TEP required. Prerequisite(s): ED 410 , ED 447 , ED 465 , EDF 461  and SPED 415 . Co-requisite(s): ED 411 , ED 444 , ED 445 , and ED 446 . (Cross-listed with ED 548).
  
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    ED 450 - Instructional Strategies II-Models


    3 credit hours
    Selection of appropriate methods and materials for teaching the various disciplines. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Stage B.
  
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    ED 455 - Instructional Strategies I Literacy


    2 credit hours
    Research on and study of new and more advanced models of teaching, methods of assessment, and further integration of technology.
  
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    ED 465 - Classroom Management in the Elementary Grades


    3 credit hours
    Planning, organization, and classroom management for elementary school. Emphasis on decision-making regarding use of strategies for prevention and intervention, professional collaboration in instructional planning, curriculum design, and importance of classroom climate. Admission to TEP required. Prerequisite(s): ED 401 , ED 481 EDF 330 , EDF 375 , SPED 407  and EXNS 480 . Co-requisite(s): ED 410 , ED 447  , EDF 461 , and SPED 415 .
  
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    ED 481 - Organization and Methods for Early Childhood Education


    3 credit hours
    Selection and organization of instructional materials and teaching methods appropriate for young children. The role of the teacher of young children as a professional whose decisions influence learning is emphasized. An interdisciplinary approach is used, including appropriate field experiences in early childhood settings. Restricted to majors in Elementary Education or Elementary/Collaborative Education. Co-requisite(s): ED 401 , EDF 330 , EDF 375 , SPED 407  and EXNS 480 . (Cross-listed with ED 581).
  
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    ED 490 - Advanced Seminar in Secondary Education


    2 credit hours
    A “capstone” experience in teacher education, which includes the opportunity to reflect, apply, and integrate various program components. Includes readings, case analyses, field cases, and the development of a teaching portfolio that demonstrates synthesis of skills and knowledge. Prerequisite(s): Admission to internship.
  
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    ED 495 - Directed Reading and Independent Study


    1-3 credit hours
    Investigation of assigned subjects through supervised reading and independent study. This course can be repeated three times for up to 3 hours credit with instructor and advisor approval. Course open to advanced students with consent of instructor.

Education Internships

  
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    EDI 440 - Internship in High School


    9 credit hours
    Full-time placement for 16 weeks of the semester at a school of grade levels 6-12. Co-requisite(s): EDI 499 .
  
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    EDI 460 - Internship in Elementary Education with Collaborative Teacher Certification


    9 credit hours
    Eight-week placement in a K-6 elementary education classroom and eight weeks in a classroom that serves students with special needs at the K-6 level. Satisfactory completion of major course work and admission to the Teacher Education Program (TEP) required. Prerequisite(s): ED 411 , ED 445 , ED 446 , ED 447 , ED 448 , ED 481 ; SPED 416 , SPED 440 , SPED 462 . Co-requisite(s): EDI 499 . (Cross-listed with EDI 560).
  
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    EDI 461 - Practicum: Deaf and Hard of Hearing


    1-3 credit hours
    Supervised diagnostic and teaching procedures with students with hearing loss, including scheduling, lesson planning, IEP development, record keeping, parent counseling, case staffing, and referral procedures. Admission to the TEP required.
  
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    EDI 462 - Internship: Deaf and Hard of Hearing


    9 credit hours
    Observation and teaching under the guidance of a certified teacher of students with hearing loss, in both elementary and secondary educational settings. Students should schedule this course for the last semester of the senior year. Satisfactory completion of major course work and admission to the TEP required.
  
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    EDI 470 - Internship in Elementary Education


    9 credit hours
    A “capstone” experience in the Teacher Education Program. Supervised school-based observation and participation for a full semester, culminating in full-time teaching in an elementary-school setting. Prerequisite(s): ED 444 , 445 , and 447 , and successful completion of Content Block and all TEP requirements. Co-requisite(s): EDI 499 .
  
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    EDI 480 - Internship in Early Childhood Education


    12 credit hours
    A “capstone” experience in the Teacher Education Program. Supervised school-based observation and participation for a full semester, culminating in full-time teaching in an early-childhood setting. Successful completion of Content Block and all TEP requirements required.
  
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    EDI 490 - Internship in Preschool Through 12th Grade


    12 credit hours
    Full-time placement for the 16 weeks of the semester. The student will be placed in a school or schools that have grades P-12. Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Stage B and all TEP requirements. Co-requisite(s): EDI 499 .
  
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    EDI 496 - Intern Supplemental Preparation I


    1 credit hour
    Supplemental preparation experience in teacher education, which includes the opportunity to reflect, apply, and integrate various program components as teacher candidates work toward resubmitting no more than one edTPA task required for certification. Pass/Fail Prerequisite(s): EDI 490  and EDI 499 . Cross-Listed with EDI 596.
  
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    EDI 497 - Intern Supplemental Preparation II


    2 credit hours
    Supplemental preparation experience in teacher education, which includes the opportunity to reflect, apply, and integrate various program components as teacher candidates work toward resubmitting no more than two tasks required for certification. Pass/Fail Prerequisite(s): EDI 490  and EDI 499 . Cross-listed with EDI 597.
  
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    EDI 498 - Intern Supplemental Preparation III


    3 credit hours
    Supplemental preparation experience in teacher education, which includes the opportunity to reflect, apply, and integrate various program components as teacher candidates work toward resubmitting the entire edTPA as required for certification. Pass/Fail Prerequisite(s): EDI 490  and EDI 499 . Cross-listed with EDI 598.
  
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    EDI 499 - Intern Certification Preparation


    3 credit hours
    A capstone experience in teacher education, which includes instruction and guidance with various internship and program exit requirements. Prerequisite(s): Admission to internship. (Cross-listed with EDI 599).

Educational Foundations

  
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    EDF 330 - Educational Psychology


    3 credit hours
    Psychology as it relates to teaching and learning. Includes theories of learning, personality, and development; motivation; growth and development; the nature and measurement of intelligence, achievement, and attitudes. Emphasis on psychological principles basic to an understanding of the learner, the learning process, and the classroom setting. Restricted to majors in Elementary Education, Elementary/Collaborative Education, or Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Co-requisite(s): ED 401 , ED 481 , EDF 375 , SPED 407  and EXNS 480 .
  
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    EDF 375 - School and Society


    3 credit hours
    The evolution of American education, including a survey of philosophical, social, political, and economic movements that have influenced its direction. Local, state, and federal policies related to finance, government, and legal aspects. The socializing role of the school and characteristics of different cultural groups. Restricted to majors in Elementary Education, Elementary/Collaborative Education, or Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Co-requisite(s): ED 401 , ED 481 , EDF 330 , SPED 407 EXNS 480 .
  
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    EDF 461 - Evaluation in Elementary Education


    3 credit hours
    The interrelation of teaching, learning, and evaluation. Includes developing skills in interpreting standardized tests, evaluating the appropriateness of standardized tests, and developing the ability to utilize measurement data in making decisions regarding instructional needs in the elementary classroom. Admission to TEP required. Prerequisite(s): ED 401 , ED 481 , EDF 330 , EDF 375 , SPED 407  and EXNS 480  . Co-requisite(s): Elementary Education: ED 410 , ED 447 , ED 465 , and SPED 415 .  Elementary/Collaborative Education: ED 410 , ED 447 , SPED 415 .
  
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    EDF 462 - Evaluation in Secondary Education


    3 credit hours
    The interrelation of teaching, learning, and evaluation. Includes developing skills in interpreting standardized test scores, evaluating the appropriateness of standardized tests, and developing the ability to utilize measurement data in making decisions regarding instructional needs in the secondary classroom.

English

  
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    ENG 100 - Composition Practicum


    1 credit hour
    Individual writing instruction to complement current ENG 101  and 102  courses. Focuses on basic grammar and revision strategies. Students meet one-on-one with the instructor to address individual composition needs. Course may be repeated for credit as curriculum changes. Credit awarded on pass/fail basis. Prerequisite(s): Department approval required.
  
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    ENG 101 - Composition I


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    Introduction to writing as a tool of liberal learning, of thinking critically, and of clarifying values. Emphasis on writing not only as a means of organizing and reporting knowledge, but also as a means to understand and deepen knowledge. To these ends, writing as an active process is emphasized, including planning, drafting, and revision. Students must receive a minimum grade of C in English 101 in order to progress on to ENG 102 . The grade for English 101 is reported as A, B, C, or NC (No Credit).
  
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    ENG 102 - Composition II


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    Continued development of skills begun in ENG 101 . Emphasis on information literacy, scholarly analysis, and purposeful syntheses of multiple sources. Students must receive a minimum grade of C in English 102 in order to progress on to ENG 231  and 232 . The grade for English 102 is reported as A, B, C, or NC (No Credit).
  
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    ENG 103 - Honors Composition I


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    An advanced introduction to writing as a tool of liberal learning, of thinking critically, and of clarifying values. Emphasis on writing not only as a means of organizing and reporting knowledge, but also as a means to understand and deepen knowledge. To these ends, writing as an active process is emphasized, including planning, drafting, and revision. Students must receive a minimum grade of C in English 103 in order to progress on to ENG 104 . The grade for English 103 is reported as A, B, C, or NC (No Credit).
  
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    ENG 104 - Honors Composition II


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    Continued development of advanced skills begun in ENG 103 . Emphasis on information literacy, scholarly analysis, and purposeful syntheses of multiple sources. Students must receive a minimum grade of C in English 104 in order to progress on to ENG 233  and 234 .The grade for English 104 is reported as A, B, C, or NC (No Credit).
  
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    ENG 180 - Theatre in the Mind


    1-3 credit hours
    Viewing and studying plays produced by the Alabama Shakespeare Festival Theatre.
  
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    ENG 231 - Global Literature: Perspectives Across Periods and Locations


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    A broad survey, exploring multiple perspectives. Traces enduring themes (such as the individual, ecology, virtue, or conspiracy) or forms (such as the novel) across a range of literary periods and cultural locations. In addition to exposing students to a diverse range of perspectives, this course is intended to strengthen analytical skills and to improve expository writing ability. Note: Each section of ENG 231 emphasizes a slightly different theme; a list of section themes is available in the main office of the Department of English and Foreign Languages. Satisfies humanities general education requirement for 3 hours in literature or 3 hours in humanities. Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  (or 104 ). Students must complete ENG 231 (or 233 ) and 232  (or 234 ) before enrolling in any English course numbered 301 or above, with the exceptions of ENG 361  and 408 .
  
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    ENG 232 - Global Literature: Perspectives Within a Period or Location


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    An in-depth study of a topic, issue, or genre within a literary period or cultural location. Explores the varied angles from which to examine a particular movement (such as modernism), form (such as the epic poem), or region (such as the Americas). In addition to deepening understanding of the variety of perspectives within literature, this course is intended to strengthen analytical skills and to improve expository writing ability. Note: Each section of ENG 232 emphasizes a slightly different topic; a list of section topics is available in the main office of the Department of English and Foreign Languages. Satisfies humanities general education requirement for 3 hours in literature or 3 hours in humanities. Prerequisite(s): ENG 102  or 104 . Students must complete ENG 231  (or 233 ) and 232 (or 234 ) before enrolling in any English course numbered 301 or above, with the exceptions of ENG 361  and 408 .
  
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    ENG 233 - Honors Global Literature: Perspectives Across Periods and Locations


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    A broad survey, exploring multiple perspectives. Traces enduring themes (such as the individual, ecology, virtue, or conspiracy) or forms (such as the novel) across a range of literary periods and cultural locations. In addition to exposing students to a diverse range of perspectives, this course is intended to strengthen analytical skills and to improve expository writing ability. Note: Each section of ENG 233 emphasizes a slightly different theme; a list of section themes is available in the main office of the Department of English and Foreign Languages. Satisfies humanities general education requirement for 3 hours in literature or 3 hours in humanities. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104 . Students must complete ENG 231  (or 233) and  232  (or 234   before enrolling in any English course numbered 301 or above, with the exceptions of ENG 361  and 408 .
  
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    ENG 234 - Honors Global Literature: Perspectives Within a Period or Location


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    An in-depth study of a topic, issue, or genre within a literary period or cultural location. Explores the varied angles from which to examine a particular movement (such as modernism), form (such as the epic poem), or region (such as the Americas). In addition to deepening understanding of the variety of perspectives within literature, this course is intended to strengthen analytical skills and to improve expository writing ability. Note: Each section of ENG 234 emphasizes a slightly different topic; a list of section topics is available in the main office of the Department of English and Foreign Languages. Satisfies humanities general education requirement for 3 hours in literature or 3 hours in humanities. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104 . Students must complete ENG 231  (or 233 ) and 232  (or 234) before enrolling in any English course numbered 301 or above, with the exceptions of ENG 361  and 408 .
  
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    ENG 261 - Introduction to Creative Writing


    3 credit hours
    Introductory workshop in multiple genres of creative writing, including poetry, fiction, and/or creative nonfiction. Appropriate for majors, minors, and non-majors. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite(s): None.
 

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