Nov 22, 2019  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin

Courses of Instruction


Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject prefix. Each course description begins with a subject prefix followed by a three-digit course number and the course title. If a course includes laboratory or other special activities, that information is contained in the course description. Prerequisites and co-requisites are also listed. A prerequisite is a course, experience, or other required preparation that must be completed before the student will be permitted to enroll in the course. A co-requisite is a course, experience, or other preparation that must be completed at the same time that the student is enrolled in the listed course.

Please note, when searching courses by “Code or Number”, an asterisk (*) can be used to return mass results. For instance, a “Code or Number” search of ” 1* ” can be entered, returning all 100-level courses.

 

History

  
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    HIST 492 - History Capstone


    3 credit hours
    This course provides the culmination of the history major experience and includes the completion and presentation of a senior thesis as well as a general knowledge test of history. Attention will also be given to developing professional skills and identities. Prerequisite(s): HIST 491 .
  
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    HIST 495 - Internship in History


    Up to 6 credit hours
    Individual reading and study with a faculty member and work on an approved project with the Alabama Department of Archives and History, the Archival Department of the Birmingham Library, the Alabama Historic Commission, or a similar cooperating institution. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  (or 103 ) and HIST 102  (or 104 ).

Honors

  
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    HNRS 100 - Honors Introductory Experience


    1 credit hour
    The Honors Introductory Experience is designed to provide a learning community and common experience for incoming Honors students, and it will provide a forum for instilling the Program’s intellectual goals and mission. Honors peer mentors will be an integral part of the course experience. This course is graded Pass/Fail. Restricted to members of the Honors Program.
  
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    HNRS 300 - Vacca Seminar


    3 credit hours
    Seminar topics vary according to the academic discipline of the visiting eminent scholar designated the Vacca Professor. Course number may be repeated for credit. Enrollment in the UM Honors Program required.
  
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    HNRS 308 - Special Topics


    1 credit hour
    Seminar topics vary according to the academic discipline of the UM professor or professors teaching the course. Topics are often interdisciplinary and may be team-taught. Course number may be repeated for credit. Enrollment in the UM Honors Program required.
  
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    HNRS 309 - Special Topics


    3 credit hours
    Seminar topics vary according to the academic discipline of the UM professor or professors teaching the course. Topics are often interdisciplinary and may be team-taught. Course number may be repeated for credit as topics change. Enrollment in the UM Honors Program required. Prerequisite(s): Certain topics may have additional pre-requisites. 
  
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    HNRS 400 - Golson Seminar


    1 credit hour
    Required of Honors Program seniors who plan to graduate “with University Honors.” Topics of general interest are selected by students and faculty participants. Participants bring to the seminars the perspective of their own disciplines and, by an exchange of views, contribute to a greater appreciation of the interrelations of academic endeavors. Students lead the seminar. Enrollment in the UM Honors Program required.
  
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    HNRS 409 - Special Topics


    3 credit hours
    Seminar topics vary according to the academic discipline of the UM professor or professors teaching the course. Topics are often interdisciplinary and may be team-taught.  Course number may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Enrollment in the UM Honors Program required. Prerequisite(s): Certain topics may have additional prerequisites. 
  
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    HNRS 490 - Thesis/Project


    0-3 credit hours
    An opportunity for senior students to propose and carry out an in-depth thesis/project integrating the major with the general educational experience. May be combined with senior seminar-type courses required of various majors. Approval must be granted by the Honors Program Director and major professor. For guidelines and proposal forms, contact the Honors Program Director.

Humanities

  
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    HUM 400 - Internship


    1-6 credit hours
    Humanities 400 is a for-credit internship program available to students majoring in humanities disciplines, who wish to have a work-world experience that draws upon their training in their major field. Typically, interns will have completed their junior year of studies. The amount of credit awarded will depend upon the number of hours worked and the kind of responsibility entailed by the internship. Typically, one hour’s academic credit will be awarded for a minimum of 30 hours of work at the worksite, up to a maximum of 6 hours of elective credit. The Internship Director, in consultation with the Chair of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, will determine the amount of credit and the appropriateness of the work-site assignment.

International and Intercultural Studies

  
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    IIS 299 - Study Away


    1-15 credit hours
    Academic and cultural experience provided at an off-campus location, either within the continental United States or abroad.
  
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    IIS 399 - Study Away


    1-15 credit hours
    Academic and cultural experience provided at an off-campus location, either within the continental United States or abroad.
  
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    IIS 499 - Study Away


    1-15 credit hours
    Academic and cultural experience provided at an off-campus location, either within the continental United States or abroad.

Latin

  
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    LAT 101 - Introductory Latin I


    3 credit hours
    Essential elements of Latin grammar and vocabulary, including pronunciation and syntax. Introduction to Roman culture and Latin derivatives in English vocabulary.
  
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    LAT 102 - Introductory Latin II


    3 credit hours
    Essential elements of Latin grammar and vocabulary. Roman culture and Latin derivatives in English vocabulary. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in LAT 101 or equivalent (or placement by departmental exam).

Management

  
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    MG 305 - Business Professional Development


    3 credit hours
    Principles and practice of business professional development. Includes business communications, career assessment and research, résumés, application letters, interviews, and career advancement strategies. Junior standing required.
  
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    MG 308 - Business and Society


    3 credit hours
    Interaction of domestic and global business with its stakeholders. Emphasis on corporate social responsibility and business ethics. Junior standing required.
  
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    MG 361 - Principles of Management and Organization Theory


    3 credit hours
    A study of the role managers play in creating and maintaining complex organizations. Organization theory and behavior are explored in the context of changing technology, a diversified work force, social and political/legal environments and the internationalization of the economy. Focus on the planning, organizing, decision-making, directing, and controlling functions of management. Sophomore standing required.
  
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    MG 371 - Nonprofit Organizations


    3 credit hours
    An overview course that introduces students to the nonprofit sector in terms of its scope and structure, examines organization and management principles relevant to nonprofits with particular attention to differences from for-profit organizations, and explores career opportunities and paths in the nonprofit sector via use of guest speakers and projects. (Cross-listed with NPS 371 .)
  
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    MG 400 - Globalization: National and International Issues


    3 credit hours
    Review of contemporary globalization process and its economic, social, and political ramifications. The course focuses on consequences of the increasing international flows of goods, services, information, and people, and studies their interdependence and co-influence.  Junior standing required.
  
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    MG 420 - Social Entrepreneurship and Sustainability


    3 credit hours
    Social entrepreneurship is a rapidly developing and changing business field in which business and nonprofit leaders design, grow, and lead mission-driven enterprises. As the traditional lines blur between nonprofit enterprises, government, and business, it is critical that business students understand the opportunities and challenges in this new landscape. Through guest speakers, case discussion, lecture, and student presentations this course will explore this emerging field. Students will be expected to develop a business plan for a social enterprise. Because the field of social entrepreneurship is interdisciplinary and in its infancy, the course will be introductory in nature and will draw heavily from cases, speaker experience, and student inquiry. (Cross-listed with NPS 420 .)
  
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    MG 460 - Special Topics in Management


    3 credit hours
    Study of a selected topic in management. Prerequisite(s): MG 361  and consent of instructor.
  
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    MG 462 - Human Resource Management


    3 credit hours
    Recruitment, selection, development, and utilization of employees in an organization, with emphasis on the strategic importance of managing an organization’s human resources. Junior standing required.
  
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    MG 464 - Leadership and Organizational Change


    3 credit hours
    An examination of the leadership role, with emphasis toward understanding that role in the various approaches to organizational change and its importance in overcoming resistance to change in organizations. Prerequisite(s): MG 361 .
  
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    MG 465 - International Management


    3 credit hours
    Managing international organizations. Emphasis on strategic decisions, necessary business activities, and the cultural considerations of international operations. Junior standing required.
  
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    MG 466 - Entrepreneurial Leadership


    3 credit hours
    The art, skill, and structure of small business management. Focus on starting, forming, and financing a new business, creating a business plan, assessment, managing a growing concern, succession planning, growth and harvest strategies. Prerequisite(s): AC 222 , MG 361 , and MK 351 .
  
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    MG 467 - Organizational Behavior


    3 credit hours
    A critical examination of human behavior theory as it relates to the management of individuals and groups in organizations. An investigation of such behavioral functions as motivation, leadership, conflict management, and stress. Prerequisite(s): MG 361 .
  
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    MG 469 - Business Policy


    3 credit hours
    Strategic management in domestic and international organizations. An integrative, capstone course using case studies to analyze business problems. Business majors only with senior standing and completion of, or concurrent registration with, all remaining business core classes.
  
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    MG 476 - Applied Research in Management


    3 credit hours
    Introduction to the relationship between practice and research, and the role of the practicing professional in research. Students develop the skills and insights to critically review research reports, discuss issues related to business research, and carry out a research study. Emphasis on the application of research to improve outcomes for management decisions. Course may be repeated for 6 total credit hours. Open to management majors who have senior standing and at least an additional 6 hours of upper-level management courses.

Management Information Systems

  
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    MIS 161 - Introduction to Computers


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    An up-to-date coverage of computers, application software, and their uses with an emphasis on personal computers, their operating systems and application software, such as word processing and spreadsheeting.
  
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    MIS 267 - Web Design and Publishing


    3 credit hours
    The study of web design, concepts, and techniques. The course covers the essential concepts of HTML, XHTML, DHTML, and how to plan, create, and publish websites. Includes hands-on experience in developing a website. Prerequisite(s): MIS 161 .
  
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    MIS 310 - Computerized Data Analysis


    3 credit hours
    Advanced elements of electronic spreadsheets and proper usage of their commands, macros, and functions. Building spreadsheets, creating graphs and formulas for financial analysis and other business applications. Prerequisite(s): MIS 161 . (Cross-listed with AC 310 ).
  
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    MIS 330 - Survey of Programming Languages


    3 credit hours
    Structured programming concepts and current program development principles and practices are covered. Includes algorithm design strategies, survey of programming environment, and basic data structures representation and algorithms. Hands-on programming using microcomputers. Prerequisite(s): MIS 161 .
  
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    MIS 350 - Business Programming


    3 credit hours
    Introduction to the design of algorithms and their implementation in Visual Basic. Covers basic and advanced programming concepts and structures, including file processing and data representation. Prerequisite(s): MIS 161 .
  
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    MIS 367 - Management Information Systems


    3 credit hours
    Review of information systems applications in business environment. The course provides knowledge on MIS technology, including review of hardware and software, types of information systems, database management, networking, security, and internet technology. The course also outlines main concepts of systems, analysis, and design. Includes hands-on experience in developing business applications.  Sophomore standing required. Prerequisite(s): MIS 161 .
  
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    MIS 370 - Internet Applications


    3 credit hours
    Advanced Internet application course covers the fundamentals of entry-level web programming and business website management, including multimedia web publishing, creating interactive web pages, and other advanced web applications. Includes hands-on experience with scripting languages for web programming. Prerequisite(s): MIS 267 .
  
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    MIS 410 - Database Management


    3 credit hours
    Introduces students to database concepts including hierarchical, network, and relational database organizations, database planning including normalization of relations, database design, functions of database management systems, and database administration. Includes analysis of database functions in business information storage and retrieval. Prerequisite(s): MIS 161  and MIS 367 .
  
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    MIS 420 - Telecommunications and Networking


    3 credit hours
    Familiarizes students with telecommunications and networking technologies and analyzing their impact on business environment. Covers basics in LAN/WAN systems and current PC and mainframe operating systems. Prerequisite(s): MIS 161 .
  
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    MIS 430 - E-Commerce


    3 credit hours
    Principles and modern trends in electronic commerce. Gives hands-on experience in designing and developing internet-based business applications. Covers advanced features for building an electronic commerce store and maintaining successful business web presence, and the impact of current communication technologies on software development, the business and social environments. Prerequisite(s): MIS 161  and 267 .
  
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    MIS 450 - Systems Analysis and Design


    3 credit hours
    Introduces structured design processes for use in the development and implementation of business information systems. Includes systems life cycle and rapid application development methodologies in systems design and development. Using productivity tools students employ systems analysis and design in designing and implementing a business information system. Prerequisite(s): MIS 367 .
  
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    MIS 460 - Selected Topics in Management Information Systems


    3 credit hours
    Readings, lectures, and discussions on subject matter so current that it is not generally included in other course offerings. Offered on an irregular basis, based on student needs and interests. Senior standing required.
  
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    MIS 476 - Applied Research in Management Information Systems


    3 credit hours
    Includes student research project as a course component, whereby students find, compile, and analyze data. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.

Marine Science

  
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    MSCI 300 - Marine Biology


    4 credit hours
    A general survey of marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates, the communities they form, and the physical and chemical factors that influence them. Field trips to the marsh, seagrass and dune habitats, and sampling from research vessels and laboratory exercises serve to introduce students to the diversity of marine habitats and organisms. This is an introductory course and not intended to be taken by students with more than 4 semester hours of marine coursework completed. Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  or 107 , and 106 .
  
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    MSCI 305 - Biology and Conservation of Marine Turtles


    2 credit hours
    This introductory course will provide an overview of the biology and conservation of marine turtles. Students will obtain a detailed knowledge of sea turtle biology and will gain an understanding of why many sea turtle species have become endangered and how proper management has allowed some populations to recover. The course will culminate with a multi-day field trip to sea turtle nesting beaches and foraging grounds in the Southeastern U.S. Class will also visit sea turtle research and rehabilitation facilities. The field trip will provide students with the opportunity to observe loggerhead, green, and leatherback turtles in their natural habitats. Topics to be covered include identification, distribution, nesting behavior, migratory behavior, feeding ecology, population biology and genetics, developmental habitats, temperature-dependent sex determination, paleontology, and conservation of marine turtles. Special fees apply and will be posted on the web at: www.disl.org. Prerequisite(s): Introductory course in biology.
  
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    MSCI 315 - Shark Biology


    2 credit hours
    This course will provide an introduction to the biology of sharks and rays, with special emphasis on regional shark fauna and field techniques. Topics to be covered include chondrichthyan origin, systematics, sensory biology, locomotion, food consumption, osmoregulation, reproductive biology, life history, ecology, fisheries, and conservation. Lectures will be supplemented with discussions of papers from the primary literature to familiarize students with current research; in addition, longline and gillnet sampling will provide students with first-hand knowledge of field techniques and local shark identification. Prerequisite(s): One course in general/organismal biology (or equivalent).
  
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    MSCI 320 - Horseshoe Crabs


    2 credit hours
    Course involves travel to Delaware Bay, home of the largest population of horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus) in the world. Students will gain and apply information on recent conflicts in horseshoe crab research and fishery management to explore political, ecological, and economic values of marine resources, options for management, conservation and outreach, conflict resolution, and applied ecology. Special fees apply and will be determined based on student enrollment in the course.
  
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    MSCI 400 - Marine Vertebrate Zoology


    4 credit hours
    A survey of marine fishes, reptiles, and mammals, with an in-depth, comprehensive treatment of their systematics, zoogeography, and ecology. Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  or 107 , and 106 .
  
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    MSCI 404 - Marine Conservation Biology


    4 credit hours
    This course is designed to develop the student’s understanding of conservation biology by building on the foundations provided in the introductory marine ecology class or a general ecology class. Prerequisite(s): MSCI 470  or BIO 205 .
  
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    MSCI 405 - Dolphins and Whales


    2 credit hours
    Lectures, audiovisual presentations, and practical exercises are used to study the classification, anatomy, and ecology of the cetaceans. Students may not take this course for credit after completing MSCI 415 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  or 107 , and 106 .
  
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    MSCI 407 - GIS Basics for Coastal and Marine Environments


    2 credit hours
    An introduction to basic concepts and uses of GIS technology in the coastal and marine environment. This is an introductory course and is not recommended for someone who has experience working with GIS or who has taken an introductory GIS course. Prerequisite(s): Computer Applications course.
  
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    MSCI 408 - GIS Applications for Coastal and Marine Environments


    2 credit hours
    An introduction to a variety of applications of GIS technology in the coastal and marine environment. Prerequisite(s): MSCI 407 .
  
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    MSCI 410 - Marine Invertebrate Zoology


    4 credit hours
    Natural history, systematics, and morphology of marine invertebrates from the Gulf of Mexico. Participation in extended field trips is required. Prerequisite(s): BIO 106 .
  
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    MSCI 412 - Marine Aquaculture


    2 credit hours
    Introduction to techniques in marine aquaculture with emphasis on nutrition and feeding, reproductive biology, water-quality requirements, and production, processing, marketing, and economics of marine aquaculture species. Courses in ichthyology, limnology, and invertebrate zoology are suggested but not required. Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  or 107 , and 106 .
  
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    MSCI 415 - Marine Mammals


    4 credit hours
    Long ago many terrestrial mammals evolved adaptations allowing them to move toward either a full or partial marine existence. These included cetaceans (toothed and baleen whales), pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walrus), sirenians (dugongs and manatees), sea otters, and the polar bear. In this course students will learn about the evolution, classification, anatomy, physiology, and behavior of these species, in addition to conservation/management issues affecting them and current methods used to research them. Students may not take this course for credit after completing MSCI 405 . Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  or 107 , and 106 .
  
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    MSCI 420 - Coastal Ornithology


    4 credit hours
    Ecology, taxonomy, and distribution of coastal and pelagic birds. Prerequisite(s): BIO 106  and/or BIO 205 .
  
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    MSCI 421 - Coastal Birds of Alabama


    2 credit hours
    This course is an introductory-level course on the coastal avian fauna with an emphasis on nesting sites and nesting behavior. This course includes the identification, population dynamics, and behavior of coastal birds. Lectures emphasize functional ecology, specifically nesting biology of numerous species found along Alabama’s coastal region. Topics include migration, mechanics of flight, breeding biology, and forging. This course is a field-based course with an emphasis on breeding biology and behavior and introduction to bird identification. Prerequisite(s): A course in undergraduate biology or ecology.
  
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    MSCI 425 - Commercial Marine Fisheries of Alabama


    2 credit hours
    Exploitation and biology of commercial vertebrates and invertebrates of Alabama and the adjoining Gulf of Mexico, with emphasis on distribution, harvesting technology, processing, and economic values. Includes visits to local processing plants and a trawling expedition aboard a research vessel.
  
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    MSCI 430 - Marine Botany


    4 credit hours
    A general survey of marine algae (microscopic and macroscopic), as well as salt marsh vegetation, mangroves, seagrass, and maritime forest communities. Lectures emphasize identification, distribution, structure, ecology, and physiology. Extensive overnight field and laboratory work involved, including the ability to wade and snorkel. This course is intensive. Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  or 107 , and 106 .
  
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    MSCI 445 - Introduction to Oceanography


    4 credit hours
    Biological, chemical, geological, and physical viewpoints of the sea. Includes lecture and laboratory. Restricted to basic science majors.
  
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    MSCI 447 - Oceanology of the Gulf of Mexico


    3 credit hours
    A descriptive study of the oceanology of the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent waters, including coastal zone, continental shelf, and deep ocean. This course provides a survey of the physics, chemistry, biology, geology, and meteorology of the continental margins and deep ocean regions in the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent waters. Restricted to science majors (or consent of instructor) required.
  
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    MSCI 451 - Coastal Climatology


    2 credit hours
    A study of the controlling factors and features of the world’s climates, with particular attention to coastal areas, and application and interpretation of climate data.
  
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    MSCI 460 - Marine Geology


    4 credit hours
    A study of the geology of the ocean basins, with special emphasis on the continental shelves, their sediments, and the sedimentary processes at work there. Emphasis on the northeast Gulf of Mexico. Prerequisite(s): Introductory Geology. Statistics recommended.
  
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    MSCI 468 - Marine Behavioral Ecology


    4 credit hours
    Introduction to principles of animal behavior as applied to marine organisms. Students will relate the evolutionary significance of these behaviors, learn techniques for observing animal behavior, and design and conduct behavioral experiments. Prerequisite(s): BIO 106 . MATH 147  is recommended.
  
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    MSCI 469 - Coral Reef Ecology


    4 credit hours
    This course will examine the ecology and evolution of coral reef communities, seagrass beds, and mangrove swamps. Current issues, including degradation of reefs by macroalgae, hurricanes, coral bleaching, diseases of corals and sea urchins, overfishing, and pollution, will be examined critically through reading the primary literature. Students will participate in lectures and laboratory exercises at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, and they will take a field trip to the Island School on Eleuthera Island, Bahamas. A current passport is required for travel. Special fees apply and will be posted on the web at: www.disl.org. Prerequisite(s): A course in ecology.
  
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    MSCI 470 - Marine Ecology


    4 credit hours
    Study of marine organisms as they interact with each other and their environment, to include examination of theories and the experimental basis of current knowledge. This is an advanced course open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  or 107 , and 106 .
  
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    MSCI 475 - Coastal Wetlands Ecology


    4 credit hours
    This course will focus on coastal and near shore wetland areas, with an emphasis on the biogeochemical processes that occur within, as well as issues that threaten and protect these important resources. Wetlands not only provide critical habitat for many aquatic and semi-aquatic species, they are also important for primary productivity, transformation of nutrients, pollutant removal, as well as provide protection from storm surges and floodwaters. Insight into wetland ecology requires understanding of the unique interactions between biology, chemistry, and hydrology. Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  (or 107 ), 106 , and 205 .
  
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    MSCI 476 - Marine Fish Diseases


    3 credit hours
    This course will introduce students to aquatic animal diseases, specifically finfish and shellfish. Students will learn practical microbiological techniques for isolation and identification. Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  or 107 , and 106 . BIO 300  is recommended.
  
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    MSCI 477 - Marine Protozoology


    2 credit hours
    This course will teach students the major groups of protists from a variety of marine habitats, including their taxonomy, structure, ecology, and methods of studying. The emphasis will be on live material from the Gulf, from salt marsh benthos and sand, from microscopic communities on solid substrates, and from other organisms. Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  or 107 , and 106 . BIO 380  is recommended.
  
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    MSCI 480 - Marine Technical Methods


    2 credit hours
    Instruments and procedures used aboard a marine research vessel, including physical, biological, chemical, and geological parameter measurements and sample collection.
  
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    MSCI 484 - Coastal Zone Management


    2 credit hours
    Ecological features and physical management policies for coastal communities, with a description of federal and state programs.
  
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    MSCI 485 - Research on Special Topics


    2-6 credit hours
    Enrollment by special arrangement in any of the course areas offered by the laboratory, subject to the availability of the appropriate staff member.
  
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    MSCI 486 - Coastal Geomorphology


    2 credit hours
    Coastal shapes and landforms and their functions.
  
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    MSCI 489 - Introduction to Neurobiology


    4 credit hours
    Students will be introduced to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of marine invertebrates and vertebrates. Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  or 107 , and 106 . BIO 342 , CHEM 121  and 122 , and PHYS 201  and 202  (or consent of instructor) are recommended.
  
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    MSCI 490 - Seminar


    1 credit hour
    Current research, scientific progress, and problems in the marine environment. Students are not required to enroll in seminar, but must attend to qualify for credit in any other Marine Science course.

Marketing

  
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    MK 351 - Principles of Marketing


    3 credit hours
    Description and analysis of institutions and operations needed to create and coordinate market transactions involving consumers, commerce, industry, and government. Sophomore standing required.
  
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    MK 352 - Professional Selling


    3 credit hours
    Interpersonal persuasive communication processes and methods explored through lectures, discussions, and individual sales presentations. Includes selected sales-force management topics. Junior standing required.
  
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    MK 353 - Marketing Communications


    3 credit hours
    A focus on the strategies that are utilized in order to promote a firm’s product and/or service offerings. Attention is given to advertising, publicity, sales promotions, and personal selling; additionally, how firms utilize information technologies in their promotional activities will be considered.  Junior standing required. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .
  
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    MK 355 - Consumer Behavior


    3 credit hours
    This course focuses on the exchange relationships between buyers and sellers. As marketers and consumers, we are active participants in both roles. From the seller’s perspective, a detailed understanding of the consumer is the starting point for the development of a successful marketing strategy. Thus, the emphasis of the class will be to investigate how marketing theory and analytic methods can provide a foundation for evaluating alternative courses of action in decisions involving pricing, promotion, advertising, market segmentation, and other strategic considerations. From the buyer’s perspective, understanding how companies use this information may help us as consumers to achieve more favorable exchange outcomes. Thus, we will also consider issues of public policy and issues of consumer protection. Junior standing required. Prerequisite(s): MK 351  
  
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    MK 356 - Sports Marketing


    3 credit hours
    This course takes an industry focus to the study of sports marketing. The purpose of the course is to help students gain a deeper understanding of sport marketing by examining in-depth the sport marketing mix of product, price, place, and promotion as well as marketing research, marketing strategy, market segmentation, branding, sponsorships, licensing venue and event marketing, global sport marketing, and public relations. Junior standing. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .
  
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    MK 370 - Experiential Marketing Consulting I


    3 credit hours
    Focuses on advertising and public relations. Using a Client-Agency approach, students will position brands and build brand awareness by targeting consumers and understanding consumer needs and motivations. Students will set advertising objectives, develop relevant messages and creative, establish media, manage budgets and timelines, and measure campaign effectiveness.  

    Marketing majors with 2.75 GPA or higher. Junior Standing. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .

  
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    MK 450 - Services Marketing


    3 credit hours
    Examination of the opportunities and difficulties faced by service organizations such as financial institutions, consulting firms, healthcare organizations, etc.  Junior standing required. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .
  
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    MK 451 - Digital Marketing


    3 credit hours
    This course is designed to introduce you to the most current tactics, applications, and trends in digital marketing. In so doing, you will finish the course with a general understanding of how companies are currently using the internet as part of their marketing plans, and develop the specific skills necessary for carrying out those plans or effectively evaluating the plans of others. Junior standing. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .
  
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    MK 452 - Strategic Marketing Management


    3 credit hours
    As the capstone offering in Marketing, this course combines knowledge of the various marketing activities as they relate to the managerial functions of planning, organizing, and controlling the marketing effort with the strategic activity of building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm.  Junior standing required. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .
  
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    MK 453 - Marketing Research


    3 credit hours
    Research tools and techniques needed to gather, distill, and analyze marketing information.  Junior standing required. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .
  
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    MK 454 - Services and Professional Selling


    3 credit hours
    Examines marketing services, professional selling, and the relationship between the two. The course develops interpersonal persuasive communication processes and methods through lectures, discussions, and projects. It will also examine difficulties faced by service organizations such as nonprofits, consulting firms, and more. Junior Standing. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .
  
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    MK 455 - Special Topics in Marketing


    3 credit hours
    Study of selected topics in marketing. This course may be repeated as topic varies. A maximum of nine credit hours may be counted toward a degree. Junior standing, and consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .
  
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    MK 456 - Web Analytics and Marketing


    3 credit hours
    Introduces students to web analytic and online marketing tools. Course demonstrates how businesses can use the web to derive customer insight and improve marketing strategy.

    Topics include: web ad design, web traffic analysis, and general online marketing applications. Prerequisite(s): MK 351  and  MK 451 .

  
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    MK 458 - International Marketing


    3 credit hours
    Managerial and operational problems of the multinational business. Emphasis on environmental differences that influence marketing strategy. Junior standing required. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .
  
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    MK 470 - Experiential Marketing Consulting II


    3 credit hours
    Focuses on advertising and public relations. Using a Client-Agency approach, students will position brands and build brand awareness by targeting consumers and understanding consumer needs and motivations. Students will set advertising objectives, develop relevant messages and creative, establish media, manage budgets and timelines, and measure campaign effectiveness. Marketing students with a 2.75 GPA or higher. Junior standing required. Prerequisite(s): MK 351  and MK 370 .
  
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    MK 476 - Applied Research in Marketing


    3 credit hours
    Faculty work with students to develop and conduct research designed to explore practical problems in marketing. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours. Junior standing required. Prerequisite(s): MK 351 .

Mass Communication

  
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    MC 100 - Introduction to Mass Media


    3 credit hours
    Students learn the historical development of all forms of mass media, including how culture both shapes and is shaped by mass media products. Course topics also include business and financial aspects of media industries and an introduction to relevant theories of communication and media effects.
  
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    MC 200 - Introduction to Mass Media Writing


    3 credit hours
    Developing and improving news writing and professional skills for print, online, and broadcast. 
  
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    MC 210 - Introduction to Media Production


    3 credit hours
    Fundamentals of photography, video, and audio production. 
  
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    MC 215 - Producing Video in the Studio


    3 credit hours
    Principles and practices of television production in a studio environment. 
  
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    MC 265 - Broadcast News Writing


    3 credit hours
    Students learn the fundamentals of writing for broadcast news, both television and radio. Course topics also include tease writing and social media.
  
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    MC 300 - Advanced Journalism Practices


    3 credit hours
    Practical approaches to print journalism, including covering a beat, developing sources, news writing, and editing. Introduction to layout and design for newspapers Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in MC 200 .
  
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    MC 305 - Media Writing


    3 credit hours
    Writing commercials, promotional announcements, and public service announcements for radio and television. 
  
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    MC 310 - Publication Layout and Design


    3 credit hours
    In-depth layout and design for newspapers, magazines, brochures, and other publications using desktop-publishing software. 
  
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    MC 315 - Video Field and Post Production


    3 credit hours
    Electronic field production for video. Scripting, producing, and directing for location videography, including lighting techniques and audio recording, and the post-production process including basic Photoshop® and video editing. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in MC 210 .
  
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    MC 320 - Multimedia Videojournalism


    3 credit hours
    Videography for television and online news. On-camera interviewing techniques. Shooting, writing, and editing news stories for the weekly campus newscast. Students are not required to appear on camera. Prerequisite(s): “C” or higher in MC 315  and MC 200 .
 

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