Feb 19, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences


Chair: Professor Truss (History).

Professors Barone (History), Day (History), Fallin (History), Gilbert (Psychology), Hultquist (History), McDonald (Anthropology), Parker (Sociology), Turner (Political Science); Associate Professors Bawden (History), Doerfler (Political Science), Lowry (Sociology), Newell (Social Work); Assistant Professors Bare (Psychology), Beal (Social Work), Bounds (Sociology), Caplow (Environmental Studies), Eckelman (Political Science), Longo (Psychology), Shepherd (Psychology), Tetloff (Social Work); Senior Clinical Instructor Duke (Social Work).


Department Office Contact Information

Dr. Ruth Truss, Chair
University of Montevallo on Main
(205) 665-6180

Mission

The Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences explores the human condition in all of its richness and complexity. While focusing on the development of the essential skills of critical analysis in the disciplines of geography, history, political science, psychology, social work, and sociology, the department fosters a commitment and capacity for informed citizenship. As active citizens, students gain an understanding of diverse social perspectives and evaluate culturally-based values and beliefs. Finally, the department instills in its graduates the ability and desire to recognize and appreciate learning as a life-long process.

General Education

Several courses in Behavioral and Social Sciences fulfill the Social and Behavioral Sciences component of the UM General Education requirements: GEOG 231 ; HIST 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 POS 200 , 250 ; PSYC 201 ; SOC 101 ; 102 ; SWK 203 , 260 , 322 . ES 100  fulfills a Science requirement, and ES 200  fulfills the Personal Development requirement.

Students majoring in History, Political Science, Psychology, Social Science, Social Work, or Sociology must complete two semesters of World Civilizations (HIST 101  and 102  or 103  and 104 ).

Majors

The department offers the bachelor’s degree (either the B.A. or the B.S.) in the following disciplines:

Environmental Studies
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology - General or Criminology
Social Work
Social Science

Internships

Faculty in Behavioral and Social Sciences encourage participation in internships. The history, political science, and sociology programs regularly offer internships, especially in the summer terms. Social Work majors complete a practicum as part of their course curriculum. Contact faculty in the pertinent programs for additional information.

Courses in Behavioral and Social Sciences

Note: 400-level courses may be cross-listed with 500-level (graduate) courses.

Programs

Courses

  •  

    AAS 200 - Introduction to African American Studies


    3 credit hours
    Through the course lectures, required readings, and discussions, students will acquire a fuller understanding about the historical and cultural development and social construction of black America: what African Americans have thought about themselves and the larger society, how they have evolved as a community with a distinct culture from slavery to the twenty-first century, and where they may be going as a people.
  •  

    ANTH 210 - Introduction to Anthropology


    3 credit hours
    The study of human variation, biological and behavioral, in the present as well as the past. This course explores the varied solutions of different peoples to the same basic problems, survival, social relationships, and the comprehension of the world in which they live.
  •  

    ANTH 211 - Introduction to Archaeology


    3 credit hours
    Introduction to the methods and theory used by archaeologists to reconstruct past societies by interpreting material culture and the landscape.
  •  

    ANTH 311 - Selected Topics in Anthropology


    3 credit hours
    Topics vary and will be announced prior to registration period. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Junior or senior standing required. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 210 .
  •  

    ANTH 410 - Theory and Methods in Anthropology


    3 credit hours
    Topics vary and will be announced prior to registration period. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Senior standing required. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 210 .
  •  

    ES 100 - Environmental Science


    4 credit hours
    General Education Course
    This course uses scientific principles to explore the interdisciplinary study of socio-ecological systems. Students will develop a knowledge base of our biological and physical environment, leading to an exploration of human interactions with the environment. Using lectures, laboratory exercises, and fieldwork, students will learn to understand environmental issues and make informed choices regarding environmental dilemmas. Topics include earth and biological systems, population dynamics, land and water use, energy resources, pollution, and global change.
  •  

    ES 200 - Environment and Society


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    ES 200 is an exploration of the relationship between human culture and ecological systems. In this course, which serves as the introductory experience for the Environmental Studies program, we will explore diverse issues in contemporary environmental thought. Students will develop well-informed perspectives on environmental topics.

     

  •  

    ES 250 - Principles of Sustainability


    3 credit hours
    This course will explore challenges and opportunities for human society to move toward sustainable living, with emphasis on the balance between social, economic, and environmental sustainability. This interdisciplinary course will entail readings, projects, and lecture-based study of the theory and practice of sustainability. Prerequisite: ES 200  recommended.
  •  

    ES 300 - Interdisciplinary Approaches to Environmental Studies


    3 credit hours
    This team-taught course focuses on interdisciplinary issues related to the natural environment to foster complex awareness of environmental concerns. Course content and instructors will change with each offering. Course number may be taken repeatedly for credit providing content differs (approval of ES Coordinator required).
  •  

    ES 310 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies


    1-4 credit hours
    This course focuses on issues related to the natural environment and serves to foster awareness of environmental concerns. Course content and instructor will change with each offering. Course number may be taken repeatedly for credit providing course content differs. Approval of ES Coordinator is required.
  •  

    ES 350 - Environmental Policy


    3 credit hours
    Study both historical and current environmental policy challenges at the local, national, and international levels. Analyze legal texts, policy documents, scholarly literature, and news media to explore the complexity of environmental governance.  ES 200  is recommended.
  •  

    ES 401 - Interdisciplinary Approaches to Environmental Studies


    3 credit hours
    This team-taught course focuses on interdisciplinary issues related to the natural environment to foster complex awareness of environmental concerns. Course content and instructors will change with each offering. Course number may be taken repeatedly for credit providing content differs. Approval of ES Coordinator is required.
  •  

    ES 405 - Environmental Education and Human Behavior


    3 credit hours
    This course uses conservation psychology as a unifying framework with which to explore how education can help humans become ecologically-minded citizens. The course includes practical training in nature interpretation. Environmental education is considered by many to be a key strategy for encouraging a sustainable society. But what are the mechanisms with which it can accomplish this? Understanding how education leads to (or hinder) change is critical to the development of environmental education programs that can better address society’s needs and lead to desired outcomes. (Cross-listed with ED 575).
  •  

    ES 410 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies


    1-4 credit hours
    This course focuses on issues related to the natural environment and serves to foster awareness of environmental concerns. Course content and instructor will change with each offering. Course number may be taken repeatedly for credit providing course content differs. Approval of ES Coordinator is required
  •  

    ES 415 - Policy and Practice of Sustainable Food


    3 credit hours
    This course will explore how the politics, policy, and economics of food impacts both human and environmental health. We will work to better understand the current system of food production, distribution, and consumption in order to explore sustainable solutions to food challenges. We will study these topics at the local, national, and global scale, as these systems are highly intertwined. We will also pay attention to our own food consumption habits throughout the semester to encourage a more mindful and informed relationship with food.
  •  

    ES 475 - Environmental Studies in Action


    3 credit hours
    Environmental Studies in Action is the ES capstone experience. The capstone is a semester-long team research/service learning project where students generate concrete products for a real-world client; these products may include written documents, presentations, infrastructure, or other material outputs. All of the projects will have an environmental component, but students may bring in other disciplines as needed in order to design innovative solutions to sustainability challenges. This course is recommended for senior year, after students have developed a solid interdisciplinary foundation in environmental studies. Prerequisite: ES 250  recommended.
  •  

    ES 480 - Environmental Studies Independent Project


    1-4 credit hours
    Environmental Studies in Action is the ES capstone experience. The capstone is a semester-long team research/service learning project where students generate concrete products for a real-world client; these products may include written documents, presentations, infrastructure, or other material outputs. All of the projects will have an environmental component, but students may bring in other disciplines as needed in order to design innovative solutions to sustainability challenges. This course is recommended for senior year, after students have developed a solid interdisciplinary foundation in environmental studies. ES 200  recommended.
  •  

    GEOG 231 - World Regional Geography


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    The nature and characteristics of places as affected by human activity. Emphases on the historical, political, economic, and social attributes of the world’s regions in relation to current world events.
  •  

    GEOG 303 - Selected Topics in Regional Geography


    3 credit hours
    Study of the physical and human geography of a particular region in the world focusing on contemporary and global issues. Topics vary and will be announced prior to registration period. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 231 .
  •  

    GEOG 331 - Human Geography


    3 credit hours
    The major organizing concepts of economic and cultural geography. Man’s geographic behavior in terms of spatial organization of the earth’s surface and his development of regional, urban, and political systems.
  •  

    GEOG 332 - Physical Geography


    3 credit hours
    Distribution and analysis of natural features of the earth. Landforms, soils, minerals, water, climates, flora, and fauna. Emphasis on human-environment relations. Junior standing required.
  •  

    GEOG 375 - Geography of the United States and Canada


    3 credit hours
    A geographical analysis of the United States and Canada, with emphasis on regional variations of social, economic, political, and historical geography.
  •  

    GEOG 405 - Urbanism and Sustainability


    3 credit hours
    History and contemporary process of urbanization; location, functions, and internal structures of cities; relations among cities and among urban, suburban, and exurban areas. Emphasis on the ecological, economic, cultural, and postmodern perspectives. Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: GEOG 231 .
  •  

    GEOG 411 - Selected Topics in Geography


    3 credit hours
    Topics vary. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  and 102 , or HIST 103  and 104 .
  •  

    GEOG 466 - Political Geography


    3 credit hours
    Major political structures and geopolitical implications of location, shape, area, culture, and natural environment of nations and states. Spatial analysis of voting behavior.
  •  

    HIST 101 - History of World Civilizations I


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    Major civilizations of the world, their institutions and basic characteristics. Civilizations covered include Mesopotamian, Egyptian, European, Indian, Chinese, Greek, Islamic, North and South American, African, and Japanese. HIST 101 and HIST 102  are prerequisites for all other history courses. Exceptions are made only when a student has fulfilled the freshman history requirement at another institution, where the requirement is HIST 211  - 212 .
  •  

    HIST 102 - History of World Civilizations II


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    Continuation of HIST 101 .
  •  

    HIST 103 - History of World Civilizations for Honors Students (Prehistoric to 1500 A.D.)


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    Same as HIST 101 , but presented at an advanced level. For honors students.
  •  

    HIST 104 - History of World Civilizations for Honors Students II (1500 A.D. to present)


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    Continuation of HIST 103 . For honors students.
  •  

    HIST 211 - History of the United States


    3 credit hours
    United States history from colonial times to 1865. Required of History majors and minors. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .

     

  •  

    HIST 212 - History of the United States


    3 credit hours
    United States history from 1865. Required of History majors and minors. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 303 - Selected Topics in History


    3 credit hours
    Topics vary. Course may be repeated for credit as often as topic changes. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 310 - Introduction to Historical Study


    3 credit hours
    Characteristics and purposes of history and methods of historical study, research, and writing; survey of philosophies and theories of History. Required of history majors. Recommended for minors. Fall Semester. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 325 - Women’s History


    3 credit hours
    The experience of women in America from the Colonial Period to the present. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 363 - History of Europe Since 1815


    3 credit hours
    General survey of Europe since Napoleon. Course includes the rise of nationalism, liberalism, imperialism, and socialism, the Two World Wars, the Cold War, and Europe’s role in world politics. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 380 - History of Latin America


    3 credit hours
    Survey of Latin American history. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 411 - Selected Topics in History


    3 credit hours
    Topics vary. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 423 - Civil Rights Movement


    3 credit hours
    Traces development of Civil Rights Movement in the United States from 1954 to 1968. Emphasis on origins of segregation, community, protest movements, and Civil Rights leaders. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 424 - Colonial Latin America


    3 credit hours
    This course examines the Americas before European conquest, the nature of Spanish and Portuguese colonialism, the impact of colonialism on the American environment, the nature of chattel slavery, the formation of multiracial and multi-ethnic societies, systems of social stratification, the collapse of colonial empires and establishment of independent republics after 1808. Special attention will be paid to factors that still affect contemporary Latin America. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 . (Cross-listed with HIST 524.)
  •  

    HIST 425 - Modern Latin America


    3 credit hours
    This course surveys major themes in Latin American history after the independence was achieved from Spain and Portugal. Since it would be impossible to provide a detailed treatment of every Latin American country, the objective of the course is to give students a working knowledge of the ideas, experiences, and problems common to the region as a whole. Political ideologies, economic underdevelopment, authoritarianism, civil rights, democratic development, and the United States’ presence in the region are some of the themes that will be covered in this course. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 426 - U.S.-Latin American Relations: 1820 to present


    3 credit hours
    This course analyzes the political, social, and cultural events that have marked the relationship between Latin American countries and the United States. Students will consider the history of individual countries, while at the same time analyzing the influence of the United States policy on the region as a whole. The goal of the course is to introduce the student to factual and interpretive material useful for making informed judgments regarding the unequal interactions between the peoples of Latin America and the United States from 1820 to the present. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 431 - Cold War Latin America


    3 credit hours
    This course examines Latin America during the Cold War with a focus on three types of politics: populism, Marxism, and anti-communist counterrevolution. Students will study the way Latin Americans supported and opposed these three types of politics, as well as their consequences for democracy, order, violence, and human rights. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 432 - History of French Film


    3 credit hours
    This course will examine developments in modern French history through the analysis of French films. We shall discuss the evolution of film techniques, the elements of film history, and the role of national identity in French history. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 433 - Modern Brazil


    3 credit hours
    This course surveys Brazilian history beginning with the founding of an independent state in 1822. Topics covered include slavery, regionalism, immigration, the economy, the armed forces, and other major themes such as race, class, gender, politics, and religion. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 435 - History of Modern Japan


    3 credit hours
    A general survey of Japanese history, from 1600 to the present. Examines the major events and trends in Japanese politics, economics, and society in an international context. Topics include: the Tokugawa legacy, the Meiji Restoration, the “Westernization” of Japan, Japanese relationships with China, the Second World War, and the post-war economic “miracle.” Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 441 - History of England I-From the Roman Conquest to 1603


    3 credit hours
    The religious, political, economic, social, and intellectual developments of the English people up through the Tudors. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 442 - History of England II-1603 to the Present


    3 credit hours
    Continuation of HIST 441 . HIST 441  is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 444 - The Islamic World


    3 credit hours
    The Islamic World surveys the birth of Islam, the structure of Islamic civilization, early disputes and enduring controversies among Muslims, and the religion’s spread to non-Arabic parts of the world. The second half of the class examines more contemporary issues such as the Islamic world’s response to European colonialism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and politics in the Islamic world. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 . (Cross-listed with HIST 543.)
  •  

    HIST 447 - Medieval European History, 476-1400


    3 credit hours
    European history from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. Emphasis will be on the religious, political, intellectual, and social development of Western Europe. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 448 - Renaissance and Reformation, 1300-1563


    3 credit hours
    Will investigate the literary, artistic, intellectual, religious, and cultural achievements of Renaissance Italy, the rise and growth of Protestantism, and the Catholic reaction, against the background of the economic, political, and social developments in Western Europe. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 455 - The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era, 1789-1815


    3 credit hours
    Origin of the French Revolution in the institutions of the old regime and the ideas of the Enlightenment. The course of revolutionary events in France and their impact throughout Europe. Emphasis on Napoleon. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 458 - History of Germany, 1871-1945


    3 credit hours
    A survey of German history beginning with the Second Reich, the Weimar Republic, and the Third Reich. Emphasis on the cultural, social, and political origins of Nazism and the Holocaust. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 460 - History of the South


    3 credit hours
    Social and cultural factors contributing to the development of the South from colonial times to the present. Some attention to political and economic development of the region. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 461 - History of Early Modern Europe, up to 1789


    3 credit hours
    A survey of European history from the Renaissance up to the outbreak of the French Revolution. Emphasis will be on the growth of Nation States; conflicts between Absolutism and Constitutionalism; the Scientific Revolution; changing social and economic patterns; and the Enlightenment. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 465 - History of France Since 1815


    3 credit hours
    A continuation of HIST 455 . Examines the major trends in French history in a European and international context. Topics include: The Bourbon Restoration, the Second Empire, the Third Republic, the Two World Wars, the Fourth and Fifth Republics, Reconstruction, Decolonization, and the European Union. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 470 - Colonial America


    3 credit hours
    A history of the American colonies, covering the social, cultural, economic, and political development of the region and its peoples to 1763. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 , and HIST 211 .
  •  

    HIST 471 - Revolutionary America


    3 credit hours
    Origins, development, and consequences of the American Revolution from 1763 to 1800. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 , and HIST 211 .
  •  

    HIST 472 - History of Alabama


    3 credit hours
    Political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the region that comprises Alabama, from prehistoric times to the present. Emphasis on local development within the framework of American history. Prerequisite(s):  

    HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 , and HIST 211  and 212 .

  •  

    HIST 473 - African-American History


    3 credit hours
    Examines the experience of blacks in America from 1619 to present, with special attention to slavery, emancipation, segregation, race, leadership, and the Civil Rights Movement. Fall Semester. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 474 - Jeffersonian-Jacksonian America


    3 credit hours
    Traces the development of the United States through the early national period, 1800-1850. Focuses on Jeffersonian Republicanism, Jacksonian Democracy, and growing sectionalism in the early 19th century. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 , and HIST 211 .
  •  

    HIST 476 - The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1850-1877


    3 credit hours
    A study of the events leading to the Civil war; the major military, diplomatic, economic, and social issues associated with the war; and the developments during Reconstruction. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 , and HIST 211 .
  •  

    HIST 477 - The Gilded Age


    3 credit hours
    Political, economic, social, and technological developments of the United States from 1877 to 1920. Topics include industrialization, labor unions, the New South, Populism, and Progressivism. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 , and HIST 212 .
  •  

    HIST 479 - History of Alabama’s Constitutions


    3 credit hours
    This course explores the historical basis for Alabama’s constitutions and considers the need for reform of the state’s 1901 Constitution. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 . (Cross-listed with HIST 579.)
  •  

    HIST 480 - Diplomatic History of the United States


    3 credit hours
    Foundations of American diplomacy and America’s expanding role in international affairs. (Cross-listed with HIST 580.)
  •  

    HIST 481 - The United States, 1900-1945


    3 credit hours
    Survey of U.S. history, with emphasis on the social, political, and economic problems of the period. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 , and HIST 212 .
  •  

    HIST 482 - The United States Since 1945


    3 credit hours
    Domestic, economic, political, and social problems from the beginning of the Cold War through the wars in Korea and Vietnam. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 , and HIST 212 .
  •  

    HIST 483 - History of Africa


    3 credit hours
    African geography, culture, and people. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 484 - U.S. Wars-Korea and Vietnam


    3 credit hours
    This course examines recent military experiences of the United States in terms of the traditional American way of preparing for and waging war. To do this the course considers the emergence of a military policy following World War II that was unique in the American experience. As national policy changed in response to the communist threat, the armed services adapted to the new demands of a hostile world. Thus, permanent readiness for war became a part of American life during the Cold War. Historical inquiry will focus on military tactics, operations, and strategies; grand strategy; foreign policy; domestic politics; international diplomacy; social impacts; and lessons learned. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 , and HIST 212 . (Cross-listed with HIST 584.)
  •  

    HIST 490 - Directed Reading and Independent Study


    3 credit hours
    Investigation of assigned subjects, supervised reading, and independent study. Open to seniors by special arrangement with the instructor. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    HIST 491 - Senior Seminar in History


    3 credit hours
    This course will include a synthesizing of previous work in history, including historiography, and how that work has contributed to an understanding of the overall subject of history. It will involve the initial stages of researching and organizing a senior thesis, which will be completed in the History Capstone course. Spring semester. Restricted to History majors who have senior status; required of all History majors. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 , and HIST 310 .
  •  

    HIST 492 - History Capstone


    3 credit hours
    This course provides the culmination of the history major experience and includes the completion and presentation of a senior thesis as well as a general knowledge test of history. Attention will also be given to developing professional skills and identities. Prerequisite(s): HIST 491 .
  •  

    HIST 495 - Internship in History


    Up to 6 credit hours
    Individual reading and study with a faculty member and work on an approved project with the Alabama Department of Archives and History, the Archival Department of the Birmingham Library, the Alabama Historic Commission, or a similar cooperating institution. Prerequisite(s): HIST 101  or 103 , and HIST 102  or 104 .
  •  

    POS 200 - American National Government


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    Constitutional background and development of American government, including the machinery, problems, and practical workings of the government.
  •  

    POS 250 - State and Local Government


    3 credit hours
    General Education Course
    An introduction to the governmental structure and politics of state and local government, with emphasis on Alabama.
  •  

    POS 303 - Selected Topics in Political Science


    3 credit hours
    Topics vary. Course may be repeated for credit as topic changes.
  •  

    POS 309 - Science Fiction and Politics


    3 credit hours
    Political themes are explored through science fiction literature and film.
  •  

    POS 310 - National Parks and Public Lands


    3 credit hours
    Explores the politics of national parks and other publicly managed lands as resources that demonstrate trade-offs among multiple interests and values, including nature conservation, public recreation, and resource exploitation.
  •  

    POS 315 - African Politics


    3 credit hours
    African political issues, culture, institutions, and their historical background, with emphasis on selected countries of Sub-Saharan Africa.
  •  

    POS 320 - Political Film


    3 credit hours
    Offers students the opportunity to explore political issues through a critical examination of political films. Selections are drawn from various genres, from the silent era to the present. Films are supplemented with critical discussions and writing.
  •  

    POS 330 - Women in Politics


    3 credit hours
    Focuses on the history of women’s participation and struggle for political equality in the United States. POS 200  recommended.
  •  

    POS 333 - Gender in World Politics


    3 credit hours
    Examines women’s rights and participation in the global community. Topics will include women’s participation in politics, economics, and protest in comparative context.
  •  

    POS 334 - Politics of the Workplace


    3 credit hours
    Focuses on issues of class and gender in the workplace. Explores the evolution of work for women of different races and classes in both the public and private spheres. POS 200  recommended.
  •  

    POS 335 - Identity Politics


    3 credit hours
    Explores how various racial, ethnic, gender and sexual identities shape political experience, participation and representation in American politics. POS 200  recommended.
  •  

    POS 340 - World Politics


    3 credit hours
    Major themes and issues in contemporary world politics will be engaged, including great power relations, international organizations, ethnonationalism, international trade, the Third World, global environment, and resources. Students will gain a unique, hands-on perspective on international politics through active participation in crisis simulation and role-playing.
  •  

    POS 350 - Model United Nations


    3 credit hours
    Students learn about the United Nations’ structure and process and major issues of global concern. They prepare to represent a designated country by learning about that country’s positions and concerns in the United Nations. They write resolutions and practice parliamentary procedure, debating, and voting in a simulation of the UN process. The course culminates with students participating in the Southern Regional Model United Nations. Course is repeatable once for general elective credit. Consent of instructor required. (Cross-listed with HNRS 309 ).
  •  

    POS 355 - Model Arab League


    3 credit hours
    Students learn about the Arab League’s structure and process, and major issues of Middle East regional concern. They prepare to represent a designated country by learning about that country’s positions and concerns in the Arab League. They write resolutions and practice parliamentary procedure, debating, and voting in a simulation of the Arab League process. The course culminates with students participating in the Southeast Regional Model Arab League. Consent of instructor required.
  •  

    POS 360 - Citizenship and Public Service


    3 credit hours
    Explores active citizenship from a variety of perspectives through in-class reading and discussion, and out-of-class service activities (i.e. Habitat for Humanity) and field trips.
  •  

    POS 370 - Research Methods in Social Sciences


    3 credit hours
    Introduction to empirical research, concentrating on research design, methods of data collection, and statistical analysis of data. Students will be introduced to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and acquire practical experience in computer-assisted research.
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    POS 380 - Foundations of Political Thought


    3 credit hours
    An introduction to political philosophy, with emphasis on the ideas of great political thinkers, from Plato to Hobbes.
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    POS 385 - Modern Political Thought


    3 credit hours
    From Locke to Marx, students will engage the evolution of modern political thought through careful reading and discussion of primary texts, and they will be encouraged to consider the relevance of the major philosophers to contemporary political life.
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    POS 405 - Great Books in Political Thought


    3 credit hours
    Students read selected books on a particular theme, participate in seminar discussion, and write a series of analytical essays. Book selection and theme vary. Students may take the course multiple times for credit.
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    POS 411 - Selected Topics in Political Science


    3 credit hours
    Topics vary. Course may be repeated for credit as often as topic changes.
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    POS 422 - American Political Thought


    3 credit hours
    Students will read and analyze seminal works in American political thought. The Federalist Papers and Democracy in America will be emphasized.
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    POS 443 - Middle East


    3 credit hours
    Middle East political issues, culture, institutions, and their historical background.
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    POS 444 - Public Policy


    3 credit hours
    Focuses on the role of government and non-government participants in the policy-making process at the federal level. In-depth explorations of certain substantive policy areas, such as education policy and environmental policy.
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    POS 445 - Public Administration


    3 credit hours
    This course focuses on organization and management practices of government institutions. Students will learn about the professional roles of public administrators in implementing public policy. POS 200  recommended. (Cross-listed with POS 545).
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    POS 446 - The Politics of Social Policy


    3 credit hours
    This course will examine the politics of healthcare and welfare in the United States, beginning with early attempts at developing and reforming these large programs, and culminating with discussions of the most recent policy outputs in both areas. Students will learn about social welfare policy making in the American political context. POS 200  recommended. (Cross-listed with POS 546).
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    POS 447 - The Politics of Sin (Morality Politics)


    3 credits
    This course explores the public policies that seek to regulate moral behaviors. Students will learn about the history, formation, relevance and implementation of morality politics. POS 200  recommended. (Cross-listed with POS 547).
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    POS 448 - Environmental Policy


    3
    Examines the politics of environmental regulation, and how environmental policies are formed and implemented in the United States. POS 200  recommended.
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    POS 455 - International Relations


    3 credit hours
    A broad range of traditional and contemporary theories of international relations will be investigated. Students will discover that the evolution of thinking about international relations is marked by both change and continuity, and they will gain new perspective on current events in world affairs through application of the theoretical method.
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