Jun 13, 2024  
2023-2024 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2023-2024 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Undergraduate Academic Policies


 

Dr. Courtney C. Bentley
Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs
Office of Academic Affairs
Calkins Hall
(205) 665-6015
cbentle2@montevallo.edu

Amanda Tinney Fox, Registrar
Registrar’s Office
Palmer Hall
(205) 665-6040
foxat@montevallo.edu

General Education Core Requirements

All students seeking an undergraduate degree at Montevallo must complete a core curriculum, which includes courses in oral and written communication, literature, humanities and fine arts, the natural sciences and mathematics, history, social and behavioral sciences, and personal development.

Purpose and Goals of General Education

The core curriculum is the most complete embodiment of the University’s mission as Alabama’s publicly funded liberal arts college. In this curriculum, the University bears continually in mind the special meaning of freedom embodied in the term “liberal arts”: the arts that free or enable students to explore the perennial questions that confront every thoughtful human being about nature, human nature and society, and metaphysics. The University provides opportunities to explore these questions through liberal studies in the sciences, literature, the fine arts, history, behavioral and social sciences, and philosophy. The University is committed to liberal inquiry, not only in its core curriculum, but also in its professional and pre-professional programs. In all of these efforts, the University aims to graduate students who can bring to their vocations, their private lives, and their civic participation the habits of lifelong learning and energetic, informed reflection.

Liberal education is possible only if the student has acquired some degree of mastery and understanding of the instruments or skills through which the human mind can absorb information about the world, come to a deepened understanding of that information, and transmit that understanding to others. Accordingly, the University dedicates a substantial portion of the core curriculum to acquiring the skills and symbol systems that, because they make it possible for the mind to grasp what is not apparent to the senses, enable genuine learning.

The University of Montevallo has adopted the Essential Learning Outcomes presented below that have been developed by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) through consultation with hundreds of colleges and universities across the nation.

AAC&U Essential Learning Outcomes

The Essential Learning Outcomes define the knowledge and skills gained from a liberal education, providing a framework to guide students’ cumulative progress.

Beginning in school, and continuing at successively higher levels across their college studies, students should prepare for twenty-first-century challenges by gaining:

Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World

  • Through study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts

Focused by engagement with big questions, both contemporary and enduring

Intellectual and Practical Skills, including

  • Inquiry and analysis
  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Written and oral communication
  • Quantitative literacy
  • Information literacy
  • Teamwork and problem solving

Practiced extensively, across the curriculum, in the context of progressively more challenging problems, projects, and standards for performance

Personal and Social Responsibility, including

  • Civic knowledge and engagement-local and global
  • Intercultural knowledge and competence
  • Ethical reasoning and action
  • Foundations and skills for lifelong learning

Anchored through active involvement with diverse communities and real-world challenges

Integrative and Applied Learning, including

  • Synthesis and advanced accomplishments across general and specialized studies

Demonstrated through the application of knowledge, skills, and responsibilities to new settings and complex problems

General Education Requirements - 50 Credit Hours

For the most-current list of approved general education (GE) courses, refer to the Registrar’s website.

Written Composition (6 Credit Hours)
English Composition I: ENG 101  or 103 * (see note below) 
English Composition II: ENG 102  or 104 * (see note below) 
 
Humanities and Fine Arts (18 Credit Hours)
Choose one Literature: ENG 231  or 233 ENG 232  or 234 ** (see note below)
Communication: COMS 101  or 102  
Choose one Fine Arts: ART 100 , 120 , 220 MC 100 325 MUS 121  or 122 , 125 , 211 , 240 255 , 342 THEA 120  or 122  
Choose One Humanity: FRN 101 , 102 , 150 ***, 201 , 202 , 250 ***; SPN 101  or 103 , 102  or 104 , 150 ***, 201 , 202 , 250 ***; GER 101 , 102 , 201 , 202 ; PHIL 110  or 111 , 180 , 220  or 221 230 , 280 , 290 REL 110  
Choose two additional Literature, Humanity or Fine Arts courses not used above:
ART 100 , 120  ,220 ; ENG 231  or 233 , ENG 232  or 234 ; FRN 101 , 102 , 150 **, 201 , 202 , 250 **; SPN 101  or 103 , 102  or 104 ,150 **, 201 , 202 , 250 **; GER 101 , 102 , 201 , 202 ; MC 100 325 ; MUS 121  or 122 , 125 211 , 240 255 , 342 ; PHIL 110  or 111 , 180 , 220 , 221 , 230 , 280 , 290 ; REL 110 THEA 120  or 122  
 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics (11 Credit Hours)
Choose two lab sciences. Must be from two different disciplines: BIO 100 , 105  or 107 106 CHEM 100 , 101 , 102 , 121 , 122 ; ESCI 100 ; GEOL 110 , 115 ; PHYS 100 , 201 , 241  
Choose one Mathematics: MATH 144 , 147 , 149 , 150 , 154  or 155 , 157 , 170  
 
History, Social and Behavioral Sciences (12 Credit Hours)
Choose one History: HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 ** (see note below)
Choose three additional History, Social and Behavioral Science courses not used above:
EC 231 , 232 ; FCS 291 , 402 ; GEOG 231 ; HIST 101  or 103 , HIST 102  or 104 ; POS 200 , 250 ; PSYC 201  or 202 ; SOC 101  or 102 ; SWK 203 , 260 , 322  
 
Personal Development (3 Credit Hours)
Choose one of the following: ART 250 , 255 CS 161 ED 427 , 447 ; ES 200 ; EXNS 120 ; FCS 281 MATH 261 MIS 161 ; MUS 228  

*Note must earn a grade of “C” or higher 

Student must earn a grade of “C” or higher to continue into the next required ENG course. 

**Note regarding the required sequence in Literature or History

Students must complete and earn credit for a six-hour sequence in Literature or History. Students may complete both sequences. A sequence in Literature consists of ENG 231 and 232. Students in the Honors Program may complete the sequence with ENG 233 and 234. A sequence in History consists of HIST 101 and 102. Students in the Honors Program may complete the sequence with HIST 103 and 104.

***Note regarding FRN and SPN 150 and 250

FRN/SPN 150 is not intended for true beginners of a language and may not be taken by students who have previous credit for FRN/SPN 101, 102, 103, and/or 104. FRN/SPN 250 may not be taken by students who have previous credit for FRN/SPN 201 and/or 202.

Transfer Courses and General Education

For transfer purposes, courses taken to meet the general studies curriculum requirements approved by the Articulation and General Studies Committee of the State of Alabama (AGSC) will apply to the University of Montevallo’s general education requirements. The AGSC requirements are degree and program specific; therefore, some courses may not apply if a student changes programs upon or after transferring to the University. Students should consult an academic advisor or the Registrar’s Office concerning substitutions or the applicability of transfer credit in satisfying general education requirements. The AGSC requirements are available at any public accredited post-secondary institution in Alabama. They can be found on the University’s website (transfer-credit/ stars) or the host website at stars.troy.edu/.

Transfer credit from institutions not covered under the AGSC articulation agreements will be evaluated in the Registrar’s Office for application to general education requirements.

Any petition for a substitution or waiver of a general education requirement originates with the student’s advisor and must be approved by the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Information Literacy Courses

The University of Montevallo is committed to enhancing student learning through an emphasis on improving information literacy skills, defined as the ability to obtain, evaluate, and effectively use information to become responsible, informed scholars and citizens. The integration of information literacy as a focus in both the General Education and major curricula supports the University’s mission. Information literacy instruction is incorporated into the curriculum through a three-tiered developmental model that introduces information literacy at the foundational level in the General Education program; advances the skills through a designated, required course in each major; and focuses on mastery in a designated, required, upper-level course within each major.

Currently Identified Information Literacy (IL) Courses

IL Foundation Courses

General Education

ENG 101 Composition I  
ENG 102 Composition II  

IL Advancing Courses

College of Arts and Sciences

BIO 206 Genetics  
CHEM 450 Instrumental Analysis  
CS 280 Algorithm Development and Data Structures  
CSD 291 Language Acquisition  
ENG 300 Introduction to the Major  
ES 250 Principles of Sustainability  
FRN 302 /SPN 302 Grammar and Composition  
HIST 310 Introduction to Historical Study  
MATH 185 Survey of Mathematics  
POS 455 International Relations  
PSYC 340 Cognitive Psychology  
SOC 240 Social Problems  
SWK 355 Research in Social Welfare  

College of Business

MK 351 Principles of Marketing  
DATA 171 Data Analytics and Society  

College of Education and Human Development

EDF 330 Educational Psychology  
EXNS 380 Physiology of Exercise  
FCS 241 Foundations of FCS  

College of Fine Arts

ART 132 Three-Dimensional Foundations  
COMS 220 Introduction to Public Relations  
MC 200 Introduction to Mass Media Writing  
MUS 341 Music History, Baroque/Classical  
THEA 300 Play Analysis, Theory and Criticism  

IL Mastery Courses

College of Arts and Sciences

BIO 307 Cell Biology  
CHEM 491 Chemistry Seminar  
CS 485 Senior Seminar in Computer Science  
CSD 481 Clinical Policies and Procedures  
ENG 485 Senior Seminar: A Capstone Course for English Majors  
ES 499 Environmental Studies in Action  
WL 480 Senior Seminar: A Capstone Course for World Language Majors  
HIST 491 Senior Seminar in History  
MATH 485 Senior Seminar  
POS 499 The Science of Politics  
PSYC 499 Senior Seminar in the History of Psychology: A Capstone Experience  
SOC 499 Sociology Capstone  
SWK 455 Social Work Practicum  

College of Business

MG 469 Business Policy  
DATA 451 Data Analysis and Mining II  

College of Education and Human Development

ED 465 Classroom Management in the Elementary Grades  
EXNS 486 - Seminar in Exercise and Nutrition Science    
FCS 330 Consumer Economics  

College of Fine Arts

ART 491 BFA Exhibition Seminar  
COMS 499 Senior Seminar in Communication Studies  
MC 320 Multimedia Videojournalism  
MC 499 Multimedia Journalism Capstone  
MUS 342 Music History, 19th Century to Present  
THEA 423 Theatre History I  

Writing Intensive Courses

The University of Montevallo understands that for students to be successful, both in college and in their chosen professions, they need strong written communication skills. To demonstrate the University’s commitment to providing students with these skills, portions of the University’ curriculum are dedicated to the teaching of writing. In general education writing courses (English 101  or 103  and 102  or 104 ), students practice the foundational writing skills they need to enter any major. Then, within each major’s core requirements, Writing Intensive (WI) courses help students hone their writing skills by practicing the kind of writing that is specific to each field of study. At the same time, WI courses also teach students sound writing techniques, such as planning, drafting, revising, and responding to feedback, that are applicable to any field. As students progress through their general education, WI, and other courses that emphasize writing, they will have the opportunity to acquire the writing skills that the University considers vital to a rigorous liberal-arts education.

Currently Identified Writing Intensive (WI) Courses

College of Arts and Sciences
Biology

BIO 206 Genetics   
BIO 307 Cell Biology  

Chemistry
CHEM 320 Analytical Chemistry   
CHEM 450 Instrumental Analysis  

Computer Science
CS 415 - Software Engineering    
CS 485 - Senior Seminar in Computer Science     

English
ENG 300 Introduction to the Major   
ENG 485 Senior Seminar: A Capstone Course for English Majors  

Environmental Studies

History
HIST 310 Introduction to Historical Study   
HIST 491 Senior Seminar in History  

Mathematics
MATH 310 Foundations of Mathematics   
MATH 470 Real Analysis  

Political Science
POS 455 International Relations   
POS 475 Constitutional Law  

Psychology
PSYC 340 Cognitive Psychology   
PSYC 499 Senior Seminar in the History of Psychology: A Capstone Experience  

Social Sciences
POS 455 International Relations   
HIST 491 Senior Seminar in History  

Social Work
SWK 350 Generalist Social Work Practice   
SWK 420 Social Work Practice with Communities and Organizations  

Sociology
SOC 324 Social Stratification   
SOC 480 Development of Sociological Theory  

Speech-Language Pathology
CSD 463 Clinical Observation   
CSD 473 Introduction to Medical Speech-Language Pathology  

World Languages
FRN /SPN 302  Grammar and Composition
WL 480 Senior Seminar: A Capstone Course for World Language Majors  

College of Business
Accounting, Finance, Management, and Marketing
MG 305 Business Professional Development   
MK 351 Principles of Marketing  

Data Analytics

College of Education and Human Development
Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing
EDHH 476 Methods and Materials for Teaching Academic Subjects to DHH Students 
EDHH 482 Assessment: Deaf and Hard of Hearing    
 

Elementary Education
ED 401 Introduction to Teaching    
ED 448 Methods and Materials for Teaching Science 
 

Exercise and Nutrition Science
EXNS 211 Motor Development  (for all concentrations except Nutrition and Wellness)
EXNS 310 Sports Nutrition  (for all concentrations)
EXNS 484 Nutrition Care Process II  (for Nutrition and Wellness concentration)

Family and Consumer Sciences
FCS 291 Individual and Family Development   

FCS 402 Dynamics of Family Relationships  

College of Fine Arts
Art
All 300/400-level Art History courses

Communication Studies
COMS 200 Introduction to Communication Research Methods   
COMS 450 Rhetorical Criticism  or
COMS 320 Communication Theory  

Mass Communication
MC 200 Introduction to Mass Media Writing  
MC 265 Broadcast News Writing and Reporting  or MC 452 Public Relations Writing  

Music
MUS 341 Music History, Baroque/Classical   
MUS 342 Music History, 19th Century to Present  

Theatre
THEA 270 Directing I   
THEA 300 Play Analysis, Theory and Criticism  

Graduation Requirements

Responsibility for meeting all graduation requirements rests with the student. In addition to the University of Montevallo’s general requirements, colleges and/or departments may have additional graduation requirements as described in the colleges’ information sections of this Bulletin.

A student will not be considered a candidate for graduation unless a graduation application is submitted online to the Registrar’s Office prior to the beginning of the pre-registration period for the student’s final regular semester. Instructions for submitting a graduation application are found on the Registrar’s Office website.

The Registrar’s Office will notify undergraduate graduation candidates and their academic advisors of the results of a final degree evaluation, including all remaining requirements for graduation, prior to the final academic advising and registration session. Graduate programs will receive periodic updated lists of applied candidates noting outstanding requirements.

General course and hour requirements for undergraduate graduation

  • Completion of the general education core requirements as stated in this Bulletin
  • Completion of at least 120 semester hours (some programs may require more than 120 hours)
  • Earned at least 30 of the last 40 semester hours required for degree completion at the University
  • Earned at least 30 semester hours of 300- and/or 400-level study at the University
  • Earned at least 25 percent of the credit hours required for the degree program at the University
  • Earned at least 50 percent of the courses required for the major(s) at the University
  • Earned at least 50 percent of the courses required for the minor(s) at the University, if applicable
  • Completion of any required senior assessments and a capstone course

Additionally:

  • No more than 64 hours of credit from a two-year institution applied toward the required 120 hours for degree completion
  • No more than 45 combined semester hours of credit earned through Advanced Placement (AP), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), International Baccalaureate (IB), General Certificate of Education (GCE) Diploma Program, and Military credit applied toward the required 120 hours for degree completion

General Grade Point Average requirements for undergraduate graduation

  • Cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 for courses required for the major(s)
  • Cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 for courses required for the minor(s), if applicable
  • Cumulative institutional GPA (UM GPA) of at least 2.0
  • Cumulative overall GPA of at least 2.0 on all courses attempted, including transfer and transient courses

Additionally:

  • Note that the major and minor GPAs are calculated using only the highest grade in each major or minor course
  • The cumulative institutional GPA (UM GPA) is the degree or graduating GPA consisting of only coursework completed at the University.
  • Some programs may require a higher overall or UM GPA.

Outstanding Financial Obligations at the time of graduation

Although students with a financial obligation to the University may be permitted to participate in commencement exercises and have their degree conferred, official transcripts and diplomas will be withheld until all financial obligations to the University are satisfied.

Commencement Participation (Undergraduate)

Fall and spring graduation candidates who complete all program requirements before the end of the semester must be present for the graduation commencement on the date assigned or receive the diploma in absentia.

Summer undergraduate graduation candidates may participate in Spring Commencement if they meet the following criteria:

  • have 18 or fewer hours to complete with verified Summer Semester enrollment at UM in all remaining requirements (including a completed transient letter, if applicable); 
  • are on track to complete any non-course program requirements by the end of the Summer Semester; and
  • have obtained at least a 2.0 major and UM GPA, or as required by their program for completion.

Students graduating in the Summer who did not meet the criteria to participate in Spring Commencement will have the option of participating in Fall Commencement. Names of all participants will be printed in the program. Therefore, a student may participate in only one commencement ceremony.

After the student completes all degree requirements, the student’s degree will be conferred on the next “degree conferred” date. This date will appear on the student’s diploma and transcript and will correspond to one of the three dates that UM confers degrees (see Academic Calendar). All graduation requirements and financial obligations must be satisfied in order to receive the diploma.

Summer candidates approved to participate in Spring Commencement will walk with preliminary honor designations based on the UM GPA at the time of Commencement. Final honors designations will be printed on the diploma and final transcript after completion.

Any exceptions to these policies must originate with the student’s Dean and will require the approval of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Specific Degree Requirements

Bachelor of Arts

In addition to the General Education curriculum, students seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second-year course sequence (201 and 202) in French, German, or Spanish. World languages not offered at the University may be taken through the BACHE program or by one of the options listed below.

Completion of the world language requirement is based on proficiency. Students have the opportunity to take a world language placement exam to determine if they may start their language studies beyond the 101 level. A student whose level of language proficiency makes it possible to bypass one or more lower-level language classes will reduce the number of hours required to complete the language sequence but will not reduce the total number of hours required for graduation. For example, a student who places in FRN 102 as a result of the placement exam will not be required to take FRN 101 but will not receive the credit hours for FRN 101. Information about the placement exam is available from the Department of English and World Languages.

A student is exempt from the world language requirement if the student speaks a language other than English and it was the language in which the student received instruction in school through at least age 12 (official documentation is required, for example, a school certificate or grade report for the last school year studied in the foreign country). This option will not reduce the total number of hours required for graduation.

International students who are native speakers of a language other than English may fulfill the world language requirement with the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or with the International English Language Testing System (IEFTS), if it was an admissions requirement and their score was satisfactory for admission to the University. This option will not reduce the total number of hours required for graduation.

Native speakers of English who have had formal education at the college level in a world language other than English that is not offered at the University must show official documentation or a College Level Examination Program (CLEP) score that satisfies the world language requirement.

Bachelor of Science

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science degree must complete a total of 18 or more credit hours in mathematics and natural science. This requires an additional 7 hours of mathematics and/or natural science course work beyond the 11 hours required in the general education core.

Other Undergraduate Degrees

For information about the Bachelor of Business Administration degree, refer to the Michael E. Stephens College of Business  section of this Bulletin. For information about the Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Music degrees, refer to the College of Fine Arts  section of this Bulletin.

Second Bachelor’s Degree Requirements

Students who have previously completed a bachelor’s degree from the University of Montevallo or another regionally accredited institution may pursue a second bachelor’s degree at the University. Students who have completed a bachelor’s degree and are pursuing a second bachelor’s degree of the same type (B.A., B.S., etc.) will be considered as having completed the general education requirements, unless additional coursework is required*. Students who are pursuing a second bachelor’s degree of a different type may be required by the department offering the degree to complete additional general education courses.

Students who have formerly earned a bachelor’s degree must meet the below requirements in addition to previously completed coursework. Requirements for the second bachelor’s degree are:

  • Earned at least 50 percent of the courses required for the major(s) at the University
  • Earned at least 50 percent of the courses required for the minor(s) at the University, if applicable
  • Earned at least 25 percent of the credit hours required for the degree program at the University
  • Earned at least 30 semester hours of 300- and/or 400-level study at the University
  • Completion of any required senior assessments and a capstone course
  • a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 for courses required for the major(s) and minors(s), if applicable
  • a minimum cumulative overall (including transfer and transient courses) and UM GPA of 2.0, calculated using all graded attempts of each course attempted

Additionally:

  • Major and minor GPAs are calculated using only the highest graded attempt in each major or minor course attempted
  • Cumulative institutional GPA (UM GPA) is the degree or graduating GPA, calculated using only coursework completed at the University
  • Some programs may require a higher UM GPA
  • Additional coursework to meet standards including, but not limited to, course prerequisites, program accreditation, teacher certification, or graduate program entry may be required. All requirements should be reviewed with the academic advisor.
  • Upon completion, candidates pursuing a second bachelor’s degree are eligible for Latin honors, but are not eligible for Superior Academic Achievement.

Double Majors

Students who select two majors must meet the degree requirements of both majors, including the General Education requirements. If the majors are in different degree programs, students will receive two diplomas simultaneously at graduation. The recipients’ names will be listed in the printed commencement program under both degree programs. However, the candidate will cross the stage only once.

Teacher Certification Requirements

Students who intend to earn teacher certification should review requirements with their advisors during their first year at the University of Montevallo. Information regarding teacher education programs may be found in the College of Education and Human Development section of this Bulletin and at the website of Teacher Education Services.

Undergraduate Graduation Honors

Latin Honors

Latin honors are awarded upon degree conferral and are designated on the transcript and on the diploma and are based on the following standard:

Cumulative UM GPA Graduation Status
3.5-3.69 cum laude
3.7-3.89 magna cum laude
3.9-4.0 summa cum laude

Superior Academic Achievement

The Superior Academic Achievement honor is awarded by the University of Montevallo to those first bachelor’s degree graduation candidates who earn the highest UM GPA for each college. If more than one candidate in a given college should earn the highest UM GPA, then each will receive the honor. Candidates receiving this honor will be recognized in the commencement program and receive a certificate along with the diploma. The Superior Academic Achievement honor is not noted on the transcript or the diploma.

Second bachelor’s degree candidates and candidates who received academic clemency in Fall 2016 or later are ineligible for this honor.

University Honors Designation

Upon satisfactory completion with an “A” or “B” of 26 semester hours of Honors Program coursework, including the Golson Seminar or Honors thesis, while maintaining a 3.2 or above GPA, students will graduate “With University Honors” and will be recognized in the commencement program. The distinction is also noted on the diploma and transcript.

Other Undergraduate Honors

Dean’s List

Students who earn at least 12 semester hours and between a 3.5 and a 3.79 GPA during a semester are placed on the Dean’s List for that term. The designation appears on the transcript.

President’s List

Students who earn at least 12 semester hours and a minimum 3.8 GPA during a semester are placed on the President’s List for that term. The designation appears on the transcript.

Academic Advising

Academic advising at the University of Montevallo empowers students throughout their time at the University to develop an educational plan that supports and coordinates their academic and professional goals. This plan is realized through a collaborative partnership between the student and the advisor (or advisors, if the student has declared more than one major).

Students must obtain approval from their advisor in order to register or pre-register for courses. A student should meet with the advisor during the preregistration advising period and should consult the advisor prior to any change in classes, prior to a change in major or minor, immediately following any report of unsatisfactory progress, and when considering withdrawal from the University.

Goals

The academic advising process at the University seeks to:

  • Establish open lines of communication regarding students’ goals and academic progress
  • Offer career guidance and support to students as they connect to their chosen degree program
  • Guide students in the creation of a plan to work toward timely graduation
  • Reaffirm the value of general education and the liberal arts experience

Student Responsibilities

To ensure a successful advising experience, students are responsible for:

  • Being familiar with the policies and requirements of the University as outlined in this Bulletin and on the University’s website
  • Monitoring their online degree evaluation, degree plan, and/or transfer evaluation so information regarding progress toward a degree is readily available
  • Meeting with their advisor at least once each semester to discuss academic and/or professional plans
  • Preparing a draft of the upcoming semester’s class schedule prior to the advising meeting that takes into account degree requirements and professional goals
  • Informing their advisor prior to any change in classes, prior to a change in major or minor, immediately following any report of unsatisfactory progress, and when considering withdrawal from the University
  • Responding to contact from their advisor in a timely manner
  • Bringing questions about opportunities such as internships, study abroad, etc., as they relate to the student’s academic plan

Students are ultimately responsible for planning and implementing their own academic programs, and no legal responsibility rests with the University. The University reserves the right to modify degree requirements, programs of study, and curricula as it deems necessary or appropriate.

Advisor Responsibilities

Students are ultimately responsible for developing and achieving their goals, but an advisor assists by:

  • Meeting with each advisee every semester to plan for steady progress toward the completion of their degree
  • Answering advisees’ questions regarding requirements for the degree program
  • Providing mentorship within the discipline
  • Providing information about limitations, alternatives, and consequences of academic program decisions
  • Directing each advisee toward appropriate professional support personnel (e.g., career planning, academic support services, and financial aid counseling)

While every effort is made to ensure accuracy of advising, neither the advisor nor the university is responsible for delays in the student’s progress to graduation if the student does not successfully follow the requirements in this Bulletin.

More information is found on the Registrar’s Office web page and the Falcon Success Center’s web page.

Declaration or Change of Major and Minor

Requirements for specific majors and minors are listed under the appropriate department headings in this Bulletin. Courses for the major and minor must be selected in consultation with the academic advisor. A minor is optional except where required for a specific major.

To declare or change a major, students may obtain a Student Program Change Form from any department office, the Registrar’s Office, or the Program and Degree Resources section of the Registrar’s Office website. The form must be submitted to the new department for approval and for the assignment of an academic advisor and then to the Registrar’s Office, where the change will be recorded.

To change a minor, a student should contact the Registrar’s Office.

Degree Evaluation

Updated degree evaluations for all currently enrolled students are available by accessing Banner Self Service at any time. Instructions for accessing and understanding the online degree evaluation is available on the Registrar’s Office website. The evaluation will display all course work applied toward the requirements for graduation. Students and advisors should check the online degree evaluation at least once a semester to verify progress and outstanding requirements. Any questions concerning degree evaluations should be directed to the student’s academic advisor or the Registrar’s Office.

Assignment of Academic Advisors

Advisors are assigned by the major department. However, if a student changes majors, a new advisor is assigned by the new major department when the change of major is approved. A student may change advisors within a department by consulting the chair of the department.

Grades and Grade Point Averages

Grading System

Grades represent the instructor’s assessment of the student’s performance on classroom and laboratory assignments as well as on essays, term papers, class participation and examinations, etc. Grades and grade points are earned and recorded as follows:

Grade Grading Standard Grade Points per Hour
A Excellent 4
B Good 3
C Satisfactory 2
D Passing 1
F Failing 0
I Incomplete -
IP In Progress -
NC No Credit -
P Pass -
S Satisfactory -
U Unsatisfactory -
W Withdrawn -

Past grading and GPA notes:

Prior to Fall 1985, the University granted semester credit on a three-point scale. Students who began their academic career under the three-point scale were allowed to continue under this system. Beginning in Fall 1985, the University granted semester credit on a four-point scale.

Additionally, the following grades codes may appear on official academic transcripts but are not currently used by the University:

Grade Code Grade Points per Hour
CR (Credit, comparable with a grade of D) 0.00
IN (Incomplete) 0.00
WD (Withdrawal) 0.00
WF (Withdrawal Failing) 0.00
WP (Withdrawal Passing) 0.00

Incomplete Grades

Grades of I (Incomplete) may be given when students, because of circumstances beyond their control, are unable to complete coursework that is assigned and/or due during the last 15 calendar days (including weekends) of long semesters and/or during the last 5 calendar days (including weekends) of the May and Summer terms. It is the student’s responsibility to make arrangements to complete remaining requirements.

All incomplete work must be finished by a date determined by the instructor and not later than the conclusion of the next long semester (i.e., for Fall semester incompletes, no later than the last day of the following Spring semester; for Spring semester, May term, and Summer term incompletes, no later than the last day of the following Fall semester). Otherwise, an I grade automatically becomes an F.

In Progress Grades

A grade of IP (In Progress) may be assigned only in designated courses and will be graded upon completion of the coursework. Designated courses may include internships, practicums, clinical, and theses where the expectation is that course requirements will not be concluded within a traditional term.  Designated courses may include more than one enrolled attempt in more than one semester.

Repeating Courses and Grades

Students who want to receive credit for a course failed at the University must repeat the course at the University. The credit hours for every occurrence of the course are used in determining the grade-point average (GPA). Students who want to receive credit for a course graded with an NC may repeat the course at the University or other regionally accredited institution. Students who want to improve a grade(s) of B or lower in a course taken at the University must repeat the course(s) at the University. The credit hours for every occurrence of the course are used in determining the GPA. The credit hours for only one occurrence of a repeated, previously passed course are included in earned hours. See General Graduation Requirements for determining the major or minor GPA.

Viewing Final Grades

Student’s final grades are posted to their academic history and are viewable through Banner Self Service at the conclusion of each semester’s final exam period.

Grade-Point Averages

The University of Montevallo grades on a 4-point scale. A student’s grade-point average (GPA) is calculated by dividing the total quality points by the total credit hours attempted for which standard letter grades of A, B, C, D, and F are assigned. Grades of AU, I, IP, NC, P, S, U, and W are not used in the calculation of the GPA.

Sample UM GPA Calculation:

Quality Points: Grade points multiplied by credit hours
Grade points are assigned as follows: A = 4; B = 3; C = 2; D = 1; F = 0
GPA Hours: Credit hours attempted for which standard letter grades are assigned
GPA: Total Quality Points divided by total GPA Hours

Course
Credit Hours
Grade
Grade Points
GPA Hours
Quality Points
BIO 105
4
C
2
4
8
ENG 231
3
A
4
3
12
PHIL 220
3
D
1
3
3
COMS 101
3
B
3
3
9
MATH 144
3
F
0
3
0
Totals
16
 
 
16
32
Term GPA = 2.0
 
 
 
 
 

The cumulative institutional GPA (UM GPA) is comprised of all applicable coursework taken at the University of Montevallo only. The cumulative overall GPA represents courses transferred from other institutions in addition to coursework taken at the University. All applicable grade-point averages, quality points, and credit hours used to determine the GPA will appear on the academic transcript. Contact the Registrar’s Office for questions related to your GPA.

Registration

Academic Year and Semester 

The University operates on the semester calendar. The academic calendar is divided into three semesters: Fall (16 weeks), Spring (16 weeks), and Summer (13-14 weeks). Further, the Summer Semester includes five sessions or parts-of-term: Full Summer (13-14 weeks), May (3 weeks), Summer I (4-5 weeks), Summer II (4-5 weeks), and Combined Summer I and II (8-10 weeks). 

All semester beginning and end dates as well as other important dates and deadlines are listed in the University and Academic Calendars available on the University’s website

Credit Hour

The University operates on the semester credit system using the standard Carnegie unit of 750 minutes of instruction per credit hour. Therefore, a standard one-credit course consists of a minimum of 750 minutes of instruction and a three-credit course 2250 minutes of instruction, including the final exam period. Courses delivered in hybrid or online format ensure equivalent learning outcomes.

Consistent with the federal definition of a credit hour, it is acceptable to replace sessions of equivalent instruction and-/-or examination with alternative forms of coursework (e.g., laboratory work, practicums, out-of-class assignments and projects, assigned readings, problem sets, discussion questions, service-learning experiences, a “capstone” project, etc.).

Course Load

Full-Time - An undergraduate student shall be considered full-time if they are enrolled in 12 or more undergraduate hours.

Part-time - An undergraduate student shall be considered part-time if they are enrolled in fewer than twelve undergraduate hours.

Half-time - An undergraduate student shall be considered half-time if they are enrolled in 6 undergraduate hours.

Registration Maximums

Undergraduate students may register for up to 19 hours each semester. A new freshman student may not take more than 19 hours during the student’s first regular semester. A new transfer student who wishes to take more than 19 hours, but no more than 22 hours, must have a cumulative overall GPA of at least 3.0. A continuing student who wishes to take more than 19 hours, but no more than 22 hours, must have a UM GPA of at least 3.0 and must have earned a GPA of at least 3.0 in the previous semester on a minimum of 12 semester hours. Exceptions to the required GPA must be approved by the department chair for the student’s major.

Additionally, each part of term in the Summer Semester is assigned a registration maximum, not to exceed a sum of 19 for the semester:

  • May - 4 hours
  • Combined - 7 hours
  • Summer I - 7 hours
  • Summer II - 7 hours

Any exception must be approved by the department chair for the student’s major.

Registration and Orientation for New Students

The University provides freshmen and transfer students a program of orientation, advising, and academic counseling prior to enrollment. The program provides students with an opportunity to better understand academic requirements and degree programs; to consider personal abilities, interests, and talents; and to become familiar with the campus and facilities.

New students are expected to participate in an orientation session prior to beginning classes. Students entering Montevallo during a Summer session or during the Spring semester attend one-day registration/orientation sessions. Fall semester transfer students attend a one-day preregistration/orientation session offered during the summer. Fall semester freshmen attend a one-day preregistration session during the summer and return to campus for Welcome Weekend immediately prior to the beginning of Fall semester classes. All new students are required to pay an orientation fee.

Preregistration for Currently Enrolled Students

Each semester, currently enrolled students may pre-register for the subsequent semester during the designated preregistration period for the upcoming semester according to their current classification or priority registration group. Prior to the academic advising period each term, registration procedures, dates, and other important registration information are available on the Registrar’s website. The schedule of classes is also available on the Registrar’s website and through Banner Self Service. Preregistration dates are also listed in the University Calendar and Academic Calendar.

Students must obtain approval from their advisor(s) prior to registration. Students should meet with their advisor(s) during the preregistration advising period. 

Schedules may be dropped for students who do not submit payment by the payment deadline as noted in the Undergraduate Financial Information  section of this Bulletin.

Registration for Temporary Undergraduate Students  

Temporary students may include high school/dual enrollment, transit, and non-degree students. Registration for temporary students is processed in the Registrar’s Office.  

Dual enrollment students seeking to add or drop a course should contact the dual enrollment liaison in the Admission’s Office and complete the appropriate request form.   

Transit students from another institution must apply for admission and submit a Letter of Good Standing or Transit Letter from their current institution listing approval for each course for which the student is seeking registration is required. An official transcript may be required to verify required prerequisites. Transit students should email registrar@montevallo.edu for registration. Registration will be processed after the pre-registration period for currently enrolled students.  

Non-degree students taking a course for enrichment must apply for admission, if not already admitted. An official transcript may be required to verify required prerequisites. Non-degree seeking undergraduate students should email registrar@montevallo.edu for registration.   

Auditing Courses 

Degree-seeking or non-degree students may audit one or more courses (i.e., without receiving grades or credit) on a space-available basis. Audit registration is processed in the Registrar’s Office and begins on the first day of each semester or part of term, pending seat availability. Students must contact the Registrar’s Office for auditing registration no later than the end of the official drop/add period. Students taking courses for credit may not change credit to audit after the drop/add period ends.  

Non-degree seeking students must apply for admission as a temporary student if not already admitted. 

Cancellation of Courses

The University reserves the right to cancel any course. Such decisions are made by the dean of the college in which the course is offered. Students will be notified of any canceled classes in which they are enrolled through UM email. 

Independent Study

Advanced students, with the approval of the instructing faculty member, department chair, and dean, may be afforded the opportunity to conduct under the guidance of a faculty member an independent study on a topic not covered in depth in other courses. Independent study courses are intended primarily for juniors and seniors whose academic performance indicates the ability to succeed in a less closely directed experience than a typical class offers. Except for extraordinary circumstances, a student may not take a regularly scheduled course on an independent study basis, nor can general education credits be earned through independent study courses. Independent study must involve a significant body of work that is clearly academic in nature and that is assigned a grade by the instructor. The instructor will develop an independent study syllabus that specifies the work the student is expected to complete, the frequency of meetings between the instructor and the student, and how the student’s grade will be determined. Published academic calendar deadlines and the established grading system apply to independent studies.

Non-Institutional credit accepted or awarded

Military Training, AP, CLEP, IB, and AICE

The University of Montevallo may grant up to a combined 45 general core and/or general elective cumulative credit and/or advanced standing from:

  • Military training and experience
  • Subject examinations of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
  • Subjects completed under the Advanced Placement Program (AP) of the College Entrance Examination Board
  • Subjects completed through the International Baccalaureate (IB)
  • Subjects completed through the General Certificate of Education (GCE) Diploma Programs

Any credit awarded will be listed on the student’s University transcript as transfer work with a grade of P (Pass) and will factor into the cumulative overall earned hours but not the cumulative overall GPA.

Official scores must be received directly from the College Board, International Baccalaureate, and/or General Certificate of Education examination boards before credit will be reviewed and awarded. Scores will be reviewed upon the student’s acceptance to the University and for purposes of admission into the Honors Program. The Registrar’s Office, in consultation with the appropriate department chair, reviews and determines awarded credit after the completion of the fall semester of the student’s senior year of high school. Inquiries should be directed to the Office of Admissions. The minimum accepted scores required for credit are found on the Registrar’s Office webpage.

The University will award general core and/or general elective credit for military experience and training based on American Council on Education (ACE) recommendations for lower and upper level of baccalaureate curricula. The University reserves the right to accept ACE recommendations as a guideline but retains responsibility for ensuring the learning outcomes of the military training credits accepted are comparable to those of courses taught by the University. Official transcript(s) must be received directly from the Joint Services Transcript, Community College of the Air Force, and/or Air University before credit will be reviewed and awarded. The Registrar’s Office reviews and determines awarded credit, in consultation with the appropriate department chair, if needed. Inquiries should be directed to the Registrar’s Office.

Non-Academic Credit

The University of Montevallo does not award academic credit for non-academic pursuits such as continuing education courses, “life experience,” or any other course work taken on a non-credit basis.

Transient Courses

A student must complete a Letter of Good Standing form, receiving approval from the academic advisor and Registrar, in order to register for courses at another college or university. All courses taken as a transient student will be included on the student’s official transcript as transfer credit and will calculate into the cumulative overall earned hours and GPA. For more information, see the Registrar’s Office web page.

Transfer Courses

All applicable transfer work will be posted to the student’s University of Montevallo transcript. The Registrar’s Office reviews and determines appropriate credit and articulation of applicable transfer work, in consultation with the appropriate department when needed. All courses accepted will be included on the student’s official transcript as transfer credit and will calculate into the cumulative overall earned hours and GPA. Students currently on academic suspension may not transfer coursework taken during their suspension.

No more than 64 semester credit hours from a community or junior college may be applied toward UM degree requirements.

Previous undergraduate college coursework will not be considered for transfer credit if it was earned from any postsecondary institutions that (1) do not offer the baccalaureate or associate degree leading to the baccalaureate degree, and/or (2) are not fully accredited by one of the six regional accrediting associations.

Drop/Add and Withdrawal Policies

Dropping and Adding courses during the allowable period

During the drop/add period, as noted on the University Calendar, a student may add a class without the professor’s permission, and a student may drop a course without incurring a grade of W either through the student’s Banner Self Service account or in the Registrar’s Office. Courses dropped during the drop/add period will be deleted from the student’s transcript. Students must initiate the drop process; failure to attend class does not constitute a formal drop. See the University Calendar for specific dates and the University refund policy for details regarding tuition and fees associated with dropping a class in this time frame.

Course Withdrawal after the Drop/Add period

After the drop/add period, students may add courses only with the written approval of the professor, department chair, and college dean. Students who wish to withdraw from a course after the drop/add period and receive a grade of W (withdrawn), must do so by the final withdrawal date shown in the University Calendar either through Banner Self Service or in the Registrar’s Office. The course withdrawal period ends at midnight on the date specified in the University Calendar; this date is approximately 60 percent through the academic term. A grade of W does not affect the student’s GPA. Student must initiate the course withdrawal process; failure to attend class does not constitute a formal course withdrawal.

After the course withdrawal period ends, a student may not withdraw from a course except in the most extenuating circumstances. Students should note that this policy typically applies only to situations that justify late withdrawal from all courses in which the student is enrolled, not just from one course. See the Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances policy below. Failure to adhere to the published course withdrawal deadline in the University Calendar does not qualify as an extenuating circumstance under this policy.

A student who is withdrawing from the final course in which the student is enrolled in a given term must submit to the Registrar’s Office a withdrawal form signed by the Student Aid Office.

Please note that the Department of Veterans Affairs or the Department of Defense may require partial repayment if a student using veteran educational benefits withdraws from a course after the drop/add period. Students using veteran educational benefits who are considering a schedule change after the drop/add period should see the University’s School Certifying Official located in the Office of Veteran and Military Affairs. There may also be consequences for members of other student groups such as athletes or international students. Athletes must have approval from the University’s Compliance Officer in Athletics to withdrawal from a course. International students must have approval from the Designated School Official in the Registrar’s Office.

Course Withdrawal for Non-Attendance/Participation

In order to comply with Federal Regulations pertaining to the proper disbursement of financial aid, students are administratively withdrawn from classes which they have “never attended” or “never participated” as reported by instructors. Registration adjustments are made soon after the beginning of each term so that student financial accounts are updated in a timely manner. A student who attends or participates in a class for any length of time cannot be withdrawn from that class for having never attended.

Instructors are required to submit a date of last attendance for a student who receives a failing grade (F or NC) at the conclusion of each term. These dates may be used for the purpose of adjusting student financial accounts in order to ensure compliance with financial aid regulations.

Students are ultimately responsible for their class schedules and for completing the withdrawal process within the established deadlines. No course withdrawals for non-attendance will be processed after the conclusion of the term.

Withdrawal from the Semester

Students intending to withdraw from the semester (meaning that they are withdrawing from all classes in which they are enrolled) prior to the withdrawal deadline must submit to the Registrar’s Office a withdrawal form signed by the Student Aid Office. If the student is receiving financial aid, the Student Aid Office will determine the effect the withdrawal may have on the student’s aid. Students residing on campus should notify the Office of Housing and Residence Life of their intent to withdraw and must check out of the residence hall within 24 hours of withdrawal. Completion of these procedures results in official withdrawal from the semester, and a grade of W is recorded for each course. Courses will not appear on the student’s transcript if the withdrawal is completed prior to the conclusion of the add/drop period. Students may not withdraw from the semester after the term withdrawal deadline, which is published in the University Calendar, unless they are approved for a Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances. Students who do not adhere to the withdrawal procedures will receive the appropriate grade(s) posted by faculty to the academic record at the conclusion of the term. For more information, see the Registrar’s Office web page.

Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances

In the case of prolonged illness, debilitating accident, family emergency, or comparably serious personal situations that occur after the withdrawal deadline and that are beyond a student’s control, the student may request a withdrawal for extenuating circumstances. A student seeking a withdrawal for extenuating circumstances must withdraw from all courses for that term; a partial withdrawal for extenuating circumstances will typically not be approved. If a withdrawal for extenuating circumstances is granted, the student will receive a W for any course in which he/she is enrolled with a special notation on the transcript denoting extenuating circumstances.

The student must complete the Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances form located on the Registrar’s web page, indicating last date of class attendance. Students must then submit the form, along with an explanation of how the situation prevents completion of the term and documentation of the circumstances (medical documentation for student or immediate family member for whom the student is responsible, death certificate of family member, etc.). All required paperwork should be submitted to the Registrar’s Office in Palmer Hall as soon as possible but no later than 30 days following the end of the term for which the student is seeking a withdrawal for extenuating circumstances. 

If a student receives approval for a Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances, a grade of W will be assigned for each course in which the student is enrolled.

Financial and academic standing should be considered prior to requesting a withdrawal for extenuating circumstances. Withdrawal from college may affect a student’s eligibility for health insurance coverage under a parent’s policy. Students should be aware that they must demonstrate Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) in order to avoid academic suspension and to continue to be eligible to receive financial aid. Low grades or excessive withdrawals may affect a student’s continued enrollment at the University or the student’s ability to receive financial aid in the future. See Satisfactory Academic Progress.

Military Leave/Withdrawal

The University of Montevallo is committed to supporting students serving in the military forces of the United States and the State of Alabama. Military students may apply for a Late Start or a Military Leave of Absence (MLOA) from the University if they are called to duty and must withdraw from the semester, leave prior to the end of the term, attend training during the semester or miss the beginning of the semester due to military orders. Details are available from the Coordinator of Veterans and Military Affairs.

Academic Progress

Class Standing

Undergraduate students are classified according to the number of hours earned at the undergraduate level, including institutional and transfer hours:

Freshman 0-29 cumulative earned hours
Sophomore 30-59 cumulative earned hours
Junior 60-89 cumulative earned hours
Senior 90 or above cumulative earned hours

A student pursuing a second bachelor’s degree will be considered a senior for registration purposes.

Good Standing

Students must maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative University of Montevallo institutional grade-point average (UM GPA) to remain in academic good standing.

Maintaining Minimum Academic Progress

A student is expected to achieve consistent progress toward the attainment of a University degree. Earning the following minimum cumulative UM GPA based on total cumulative GPA hours is considered minimum academic progress:

Number of Cumulative GPA Hours (including institutional and transfer) Minimum UM GPA
0-29  1.5
30-59 1.7
60-89 1.9
90+ (includes all second bachelor’s degree students) 2.0

Academic Warning

At the end of each semester, a student will be placed on Academic Warning when his or her cumulative UM GPA is below 2.0 but above the appropriate minimum academic progress standard as defined previously. A student may be removed from Academic Warning only by attaining a minimum 2.0 cumulative UM GPA. Academic Warning will be noted on the student’s academic transcript. Academic Warning does not restrict registration for a subsequent term.

Freshman Academic Warning

A first-time freshman will be placed on Freshman Academic Warning for one regular semester if his or her cumulative UM GPA is below 2.0. First-time freshmen are students with fewer than 30 earned hours with no prior enrollment at a post-secondary institution at the undergraduate level. This includes students enrolled at UM during the fall semester who first attended college during the prior summer term, as well as students who entered UM with college-level credit earned prior to graduating from high school.

Freshman Academic Warning will be noted on the student’s academic transcript. Freshman Academic Warning does not restrict registration for a subsequent term. Students placed on Freshman Academic Warning are urged to schedule an appointment with their advisor to review academic progress prior to the first day of classes in the subsequent term.

Academic Suspension

Academic suspension typically results from a student’s failure to demonstrate satisfactory academic progress; however, it is also possible for a student to be suspended as a result of academic dishonesty (see policy on Academic Dishonesty).

A student may not attend the University during the period of the student’s suspension. Students should be aware that once they are placed on suspension from the University, they are no longer making satisfactory academic progress as required for continued receipt of financial aid. Students petitioning for reinstatement to the University under the procedure outlined in the following must apply separately to the Student Aid Office in order to regain financial aid. A student may not transfer to the University any credits earned at another college or university while on suspension.

Students returning from suspension and students who have successfully petitioned to continue are all in required to meet with the Falcon Success Center no later than two weeks into the regular semester in which they return or continue in order to develop a success plan. Success plans will be created with input from the student, FSC staff, faculty advisor, and department chair, Dean, or College Reinstatement Committee (depending on reinstatement process). Progress of the success plan will be considered for additional petitions (second, indefinite) if needed.

First-time freshmen may be placed on Freshman Academic Warning but are not subject to suspension for failure to meet minimum standards for academic progress until the end of their second regular semester at the University. Freshmen may, however, be suspended as a result of academic dishonesty. All other students are subject to suspension at the end of any regular semester when they fail to meet minimum standards for academic progress or may be suspended as a result of academic dishonesty.

First Suspension

A student who does not maintain minimum academic progress, as defined previously, will be suspended from study for one regular semester, and the suspension will be noted on the student’s official transcript. A student placed on First Suspension at the end of the spring semester may attend the summer term at the University to improve their GPA. If summer enrollment results in the student meeting minimum academic progress standards, the student will be permitted to enroll for the fall semester.

A student may also petition the Department Chair of the student’s major to be allowed to continue enrollment in the next regular semester through the reinstatement review process. For a student who has not declared a major or who has more than one major, the Provost will determine the appropriate party to consider reinstatement.

If the student’s reinstatement petition is denied or the student does not meet standards for minimum academic progress through courses completed during the summer term, the student will not be permitted to enroll in the next regular semester.

Students allowed to continue enrollment or returning from the one suspended semester will be required to earn a semester UM GPA of 2.0 or higher on 12 or 13 semester hours (unless the Dean approves a reduced number of hours) in order to continue enrollment. The student will then be required to meet the minimum standards for academic progress in subsequent semesters.

Second Suspension

A student who returns from their first academic suspension and does not earn a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher on the required number of semester hours or who in a future semester fails to meet minimum standards for academic progress will be suspended for two regular semesters. A student placed on Second Suspension at the end of the spring semester will be allowed to enroll in the summer semester. If summer enrollment results in the student meeting the minimum academic progress standards, the student will be permitted to enroll for the fall semester.

A student may also petition the Reinstatement Committee in the student’s college to be allowed to continue enrollment in the next regular semester. For a student who has not declared a major or who has more than one major, the Provost will identify the Reinstatement Committee.

If the student’s reinstatement petition is denied or the student does not meet standards for minimum academic progress through courses completed during the summer term, the student will not be permitted to enroll for the next two regular semesters.

Students allowed to continue enrollment or returning from the two suspended semesters will be required to earn a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher on 12 or 13 semester hours (unless the Dean approves a reduced number of hours) in the next regular semester in order to continue enrollment. The student will then be required to meet the minimum standards for academic progress in subsequent semesters.

Indefinite Suspension

A student who returns from their second academic suspension and does not earn a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher on the required number of semester hours or who in a future semester fails to meet minimum standards for academic progress will be placed on Indefinite Suspension and may not enroll in any term (including summer). An appeal will not be considered by the College Reinstatement Committee until the student has been out of school for a minimum of two regular semesters.

Reinstatement Petition Process

First Suspension-Appeal to Department Chair

After a student’s first suspension, the student must make an appointment to meet with the appropriate Department Chair to present the student’s case for reinstatement no later than three (3) weekdays prior to the beginning of a regular semester. If the Department Chair denies the request, the student may appeal to the Dean. The decision of the Dean is final and will be communicated to the Registrar’s Office, the Student Aid Office, Housing and Residency Office, and other administrative offices as appropriate.

Second Suspension-Appeal to College Reinstatement Committee

The procedure for applying for reinstatement is as follows:

  1. The student must complete a reinstatement petition, available from the Registrar’s Office, and submit it to the Reinstatement Committee of the college from which the student was suspended no later than four (4) weekdays prior to the beginning of a regular semester.
  2. The Reinstatement Committee (see following description) will review the student’s petition and may require a meeting with the student. The Committee may approve the petition, may approve the petition with stipulations, or may disapprove the petition. Stipulations may include limiting the number of courses the student may take or specifying the GPA the student must earn in the next semester.
  3. If the Reinstatement Committee denies the student’s petition, the student may appeal in writing to the college Dean. The decision of the dean will be final. The student may not appeal a positive decision.
  4. The final decision of the Reinstatement Committee or Dean will be communicated to the Registrar’s Office, Student Aid Office, Housing and Residency Office, and other administrative offices as appropriate.

Reinstatement Committee

Reinstatement Committees are charged with reviewing petitions submitted by students who are pursuing majors offered by the given college; these committees consider reinstatement petitions following second or indefinite suspensions. Reinstatement Committees are appointed by college Deans and consist of three members, usually department chairs.

Special Conditions Policy

Students who are not in good academic standing may not be eligible to participate in certain extracurricular activities. If a student is ineligible for participation in an extracurricular activity due to not being in good academic standing, the student may submit a written appeal to the Dean of Students. The Dean of Students (or designee) will consult with the student’s academic advisor, the student’s professors for the most recent term, and the faculty/staff representative (if applicable) for the student group. After consultation, the Dean of Students (or designee) will then render a decision on the student’s eligibility for participation in extracurricular activities. The decision is final.

Other Academic Policies

Academic Clemency

Academic Clemency is designed for former undergraduate students returning to the University of Montevallo whose UM GPA during previous enrollments make it impossible or highly unlikely for them ever to graduate. Academic Clemency offers former students the opportunity to resume their college studies with a realistic possibility of completing an undergraduate degree. Students who were suspended or expelled from the University for academic dishonesty or misconduct are not eligible for Academic Clemency. Academic Clemency may be awarded only once, cannot be awarded retroactively, and cannot be revoked. Established requirements for repeating classes, admission to, or progression in specific academic degree programs take precedence over this policy.

A former student may apply for Academic Clemency to the Dean of the college in which the student intends to pursue a major if the student has not been enrolled at any academic institution for at least 36 months and has not previously been granted Academic Clemency at the University. The student must earn a 2.5 GPA or higher in at least 12 hours of degree-applicable course work (approved by the dean) in the first term following readmission to the University in order for Clemency to be applied. Once Clemency has been earned, the following rules apply to the student’s academic record:

  • Degree requirements will be in accordance with those in effect at the time of the student’s readmission.
  • All previous academic work will remain on the student’s transcript with an appropriate notation, but the grades for previous work are not used in computing the UM GPA. Institutional courses in which grades of “C” or higher were earned during previous attendance may be applied to graduation requirements. Institutional courses in which grades of “D” were earned during previous college attendance may not be applied to graduation requirements.
  • No adjustments will be made to previously accepted transfer coursework.
  • After Clemency is granted, the student’s UM GPA will be recalculated beginning with the semester in which the student was readmitted to the University through the Academic Clemency process. The student’s academic standing in previous semesters will not be changed. Policies governing satisfactory academic progress, probation, and suspension will govern eligibility for continued enrollment following readmission.
  • Students who are granted Academic Clemency may not receive undergraduate graduation honors. 

Academic Integrity Policy

Students at the University of Montevallo uphold the values of the University by refraining from every form of dishonesty in college life and by doing all that is possible to create a spirit of honesty and integrity on campus.  

Students are expected to follow the behaviors within the Student Code of Conduct, but this policy specifically addresses academic misconduct.  

As stated in the Fledgling, Academic dishonesty is defined as cheating or plagiarism. Cheating is the giving or receiving of unauthorized aid, whether written, oral or otherwise, in order for a student to receive undeserved credit for work that is their own responsibility. Plagiarism occurs when a student uses the words or the ideas of another without acknowledging that they belong to someone else. 

Briefly, there are five main ways in which a student can commit plagiarism: 

  • Using the exact words of another person’s work/writing without acknowledgment of the source through the use of quotation marks and correct citation/documentation 
  • Rephrasing a passage by another writer without giving proper credit 
  • Using someone else’s facts or ideas without acknowledgment 
  • Using a piece of writing for one course that was already used in a previous course (or in courses in which one is simultaneously enrolled) without express permission from both instructors to do so 
  • Presenting fabricated or falsified citations or materials 
  • Students may not give or receive unauthorized aid in completing academic work and meeting academic requirements. Only the faculty member teaching the course can authorize assistance, use of resources, etc. Students who are uncertain about whether conduct would constitute academic dishonesty are responsible for seeking clarification from the faculty member prior to engaging in such conduct.  Accountability measures for academic dishonesty are determined based on the seriousness of the offense and on whether the student has a record of other instances of academic dishonesty. 

If the academic dishonesty pertains to a non-course degree requirement, such as a standardized examination, then the student may fail to receive credit for the degree requirement for which the violation occurred. The consequences for the violation of a non-course degree requirement may be imposed by the appropriate department chair or college dean. 

If the academic dishonesty pertains to an assignment in a course, the faculty member teaching the course in which the violation occurred may determine the course-based consequences, e.g., an academic integrity development plan, a zero on the assignment, a grade of F in the course, etc. 

In addition to these consequences, the faculty member or academic administrator should refer all serious academic integrity violations to the Office of the Provost for record keeping and/or possible further sanctions via the Academic Dishonesty Incident Report. (Individual faculty members may define what constitutes a serious academic integrity violation in their course(s), provided that their definition is included in the course syllabus.) 

The Office of the Provost will serve as the central recording center for all Academic Dishonesty Incident reports. Thus, if a student has multiple violations on record, the Office of the Provost may take action as they deem appropriate, e.g., by recommending an Academic Integrity Development Plan, referring the case to the Academic Integrity Council, implementing the Academic Integrity Council’s recommended disciplinary action (such as suspension or expulsion), etc. 

The following is an outline of the process for resolving allegations of academic dishonesty. (The Academic Integrity Council, in collaboration with the Provost, Deans, and Chairs, is charged with determining and communicating the full procedure.) 

  1. The instructor responsible for the course at the time of the incident will determine the appropriate course-based consequences AND complete the online Academic Dishonesty Incident (ADI) form as soon as possible, but within 21 business days from the date the assignment was graded.   
  2. Upon filing the online Academic Dishonesty Incident form, the instructor of record will note whether the referral is for record keeping only (“Faculty Discretion”) or for further review and consideration by the Academic Integrity Council (“Disciplinary Referral”). An instructor who recommends Disciplinary Referral can also recommend an appropriate disciplinary action for the student. 
    1. Notice of the Academic Dishonesty Incident report will automatically be distributed to the instructor of record, the chair of the department in which the incident occurred, the dean of the College, the Dean of Students, and the Registrar. 
    2. After two “Faculty Discretion” referrals for the same student, the Office of the Provost will automatically refer the case for further consideration by the Academic Integrity Council. (Moreover, in response to multiple violations by the same student, further disciplinary measures may be taken at the discretion of the Provost’s Office.) 
    3. If necessary, a hold will be placed on the student’s account until the case is fully resolved, thereby prohibiting the student from dropping or withdrawing from the course. (See point 9c.) 
  3. The Provost’s Office will promptly contact the student via email to inform them that an Academic Dishonesty Incident form has been filed. This email will state the charges against the student and include copies of any documentation of the incident. Once this email has been sent to the student’s official UM email address, the student is considered to have been notified of the charges. (The faculty member who filed the Academic Dishonesty Incident form will be copied on this email as well.) 
    1. If the instructor responsible for the course chooses to refer the case for “Faculty Discretion” and no further action is taken, the Provost’s Office will inform the student of this. The Provost’s Office will also warn the student that any further incidents will merit further action. 
    2. If the instructor responsible for the course chooses to refer the case for “Disciplinary Referral,” or if the case is automatically referred to the Academic Integrity Council, the Provost’s Office will notify the student of the situation and inform them that a hearing will take place. 
    3. Once the student has been notified of the academic dishonesty charge, the course-based consequence(s) determined by the instructor will be carried out. 
    4. The student may discuss the academic dishonesty charge with their instructor if desired. The discussion should take place either (i) via email or (ii) in person with another faculty member, or the department chair, as a witness to the discussion. (Instructors may choose the format of the discussion and may also ask to initiate the discussion.) 
  4. In cases of “Disciplinary Referral” or automatic referral, the Academic Integrity Council will call a hearing according to their procedures. The accused student should attend the hearing; however, the hearing will take place even if the student fails to attend. 
  5. Upon completion of the hearing, the Academic Integrity Council may recommend accountability measures at their discretion.  Depending on the severity of the allegation and/or the number of allegations, these measures may include, but are not limited to:  
    1. No further action 
    2. Targeted instruction and/or guidance 
    3. A zero on the assignment 
    4. An F in the course 
    5. Suspension 
    6. Expulsion 
  6. The Academic Integrity Council will forward its recommendation to the Provost’s Office.  Upon approval from the Provost’s Office, appropriate course-based actions and/or administrative actions will be carried out, and notification will be sent to the student, the student’s advisor, the instructor, the Department Chair, the Deans of the college in which the incident occurred and the college in which the student is enrolled, the Dean of Students, and other appropriate parties (Registrar, Director of Housing and Residence Life, etc.).   
  7. Students who wish to appeal the course-based consequences determined by their instructor must do so by contacting the Office of the Provost within 5 business days of being notified of the academic dishonesty charge to request that the case be reviewed. If the instructor who submitted the Academic Dishonesty Incident report selected “Faculty Discretion” (and the case was not automatically referred to the Academic Integrity Council), the appeal will be reviewed by the Academic Integrity Council; if the instructor selected “Disciplinary Referral” or the case was automatically referred to the Academic Integrity Council, the appeal will be reviewed by the Office of the Provost (or designee). The process outlined below will be followed: 
    1. The faculty member will be informed of the pending appeal. 
    2. The appropriate reviewer(s) will make a determination of the validity of the charges.   
      1. If the reviewer fails to find sufficient justification for the charges, then the Office of the Provost will inform the student, the instructor, the Department Chair and the Dean.  The instructor will be asked to reassess the assigned grade, or reassess the course-based consequences, etc., and will be notified that he or she may be in an untenable legal position if he or she elects not to do so.  The faculty member’s reassessment of the grade/consequence may or may not result in a different grade depending on the quality of the student’s performance on the assignment(s). 
      2. If the reviewer finds that the charges are justified, the Office of the Provost will notify the student, the student’s advisor, the instructor, the Department Chair, the Deans of the college in which the incident occurred and the college in which the student is enrolled, the Dean of Students, and other appropriate parties (the Registrar, the Director of Housing and Resident Life, etc.) of the outcome of the appeal.  In the case of a student appeal of a faculty-imposed consequence, the reviewer may not impose a consequence stronger than the initial one. 
  8. In the case of “Disciplinary Referral” (or automatic referral), students who wish to appeal the recommendation of the Academic Integrity Council must submit a written formal appeal to the Office of the Provost within 5 business days of the announcement of the Academic Integrity Council’s decision. The Office of the Provost, or designee, will make a decision on the appeal; this decision will be final. 
  9. When an academic dishonesty charge is filed against a student in a course, that student’s eligibility for withdrawing from the course is determined as follows: 
    1. If, in the final outcome of the case (taking into account the result of any appeals), the student is given the consequence of “F in the course,” then the student cannot evade this consequence by withdrawing from the course. In this situation, the student will not be allowed to withdraw from the course under any circumstances, including circumstances which would normally constitute grounds for “Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances.” 
    2. If the final outcome of the case (taking into account the result of any appeals) still allows the student to receive credit for the course, then the student’s eligibility for withdrawal depends upon the timing of the incident and/or the timing of the final conclusion of the case: 
      1. If the case fully concluded on or before the last day to withdraw, then the student may choose to withdraw, provided that they do so on or before the last day to withdraw. In this situation, if the student does not withdraw on or before the last day to withdraw, then they can no longer withdraw unless they are approved for “Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances.” 
      2. If the academic dishonesty incident took place on or before the last day to withdraw, but the final conclusion of the case occurred after the last day to withdraw, then the student has a window of 5 business days after the final conclusion of the case in which the student may choose to withdraw. After that window of 5 business days has passed, the student cannot withdraw unless they are approved for “Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances.” 
      3. If the academic dishonesty incident took place after the last day to withdraw, then the student cannot withdraw unless they are approved for “Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances.” 
    3. If a student may ultimately receive an “F in the course” as a consequence of an academic dishonesty charge, e.g., 
      1. The faculty member filing the Academic Dishonesty Incident form chooses “Faculty Discretion” with the course-based consequence of “F in the course”; 
      2. The faculty member chooses “Disciplinary Referral”; or 
      3. The case is automatically referred to the Academic Integrity Council, then a hold will be placed on the student’s account (temporarily preventing the student from dropping/withdrawing from the course) until the case, including any appeals, is fully resolved. After the case is fully resolved, the student’s eligibility for withdrawal is determined by the rules laid out in points 9a and 9b. 
    4. If a student allegedly committed an academic integrity violation but withdrew from the course before an ADI form could be filed, then the instructor can still file an ADI form against the student (provided that the form is filed in a timely manner) and the ADI resolution procedure will still be followed. 
  10. If a student incurs an academic integrity violation and the student accepts the consequences (or the student’s appeal, if any, is rejected), then any grade penalty resulting from said violation cannot be used as a basis for any future grade appeals. In this situation, only grades that are not related to the student’s academic integrity violation are eligible for grade appeals. On the other hand, if a student’s appeal of an academic integrity violation is accepted, then any grade that had been impacted by the consequences of the academic integrity violation is again eligible for grade appeals. Note that student appeals of academic integrity violations can only be made within the time limits stated in this policy; see points 7 and 8. Also, students must appeal an academic integrity violation in a course, and the appeal must be resolved in the student’s favor, before the student may appeal any grades impacted by said violation. (See Grade Appeals.) 

Rights of the Accused Student: 

  1. To be informed of the charge against them, to receive copies of any documentation supporting the charge, and to be informed of any recommended accountability measures 

  1. To be informed of the date and time of a hearing, if necessary, and the procedures involved 

  1. To present witnesses, documentation and other evidence at the hearing, and to have an advocate present 

  1. To continue in the course without prejudice until the outcome of the hearing 

  1. To appeal the decision 

Rights and Responsibilities of Faculty, Staff, and Administration: 

  1. To establish norms of conduct related to academic integrity in their classrooms and assign grades accordingly 

  1. To help promote a culture of academic integrity by reporting suspected violations of the Academic Integrity Policy 

  1. To be informed of the procedures of the Academic Integrity Council 

  1. To be present (either by choice, or as required by the Academic Integrity Council) at any hearing related to a charge of academic dishonesty levied by the faculty 

Other information: 

Business Day - A business day is any day the administrative offices of the university are open for business. 

Timeliness - Every effort will be made to carry out the ADI resolution procedure (including review of any appeals) in a timely manner. However, the procedure may be delayed due to factors such as the semester (or part of term) ending, the university being closed, or semester breaks. 

Attendance and Absences

In general, course attendance is not open to the public. To attend or participate in a course at the University of Montevallo, one must be admitted and enrolled in the course or, for good cause, be granted permission to sit in on the class as an authorized visitor or guest speaker. Only individuals meeting the above criteria should be allowed in the classroom. 

For the safety and welfare of our students, faculty, and staff, it is important to have a record of all individuals in each classroom. Overall classroom management is vested with the faculty member holding the class; accordingly, faculty may request that any unauthorized individuals exit or not return to the classroom.  In cases of unauthorized classroom attendance, the department chair should be notified and a record of the incident created.

The University expects students to attend all classes for which they are enrolled. Instructors may establish specific regulations governing their classes and will provide them to their students in the course syllabus at the beginning of each semester. (UM Policy 02:300 Student Class Absences)

All policy statements must be on file in the office of the dean, they must be approved by the appropriate dean, and they must allow excused absences for these reasons:

  • Travel considered part of the instructional program of the University and requiring absence from class
  • Participation in activities directly sponsored by and in the interest of the University
  • Extraordinary circumstances, such as pressing legal obligations, authorized by the college dean

Policies must allow for a reasonable number of absences for these reasons:

  • Illness
  • Death or serious illness in the immediate family

Instructors determine the validity of excuses and are responsible for consistent enforcement of their policies. Students may appeal decisions via established procedures for grievances concerning academic matters.

Bulletin Requirements and Enrollment Timeliness

A student’s degree requirements are established by the Bulletin in effect at the time a student enrolls at the University of Montevallo as a degree seeking student. A student who leaves the University and returns within four years may remain under the student’s initial Bulletin. Students returning after an absence of more than four years will be required to change to the Bulletin in effect at the time of their return, unless a waiver is issued by the major department chair.

A student may request to change to a more recent Bulletin (after consultation with the student’s academic advisor) by submitting a Student Program Change form to the Registrar’s Office. Students who change majors may also be required to change to the current Bulletin.

Please note that some programs are recognized by an accrediting organization or designed to assure eligibility for official certification or licensure, such as teaching, social work, or speech pathology. Sometimes accrediting organizations or governmental units will modify the student’s requirements necessary for certification or licensure. Students may be required to change to a more recent Bulletin in order to adhere to all governmental and/or accreditation modifications made during their period of enrollment.

Confidentiality of Records

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are as follows:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access.

Students should submit a written request to the Registrar identifying the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Registrar will arrange access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.

  1. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students should write to the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.

If the University decides not to amend the records requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

  1. The right to provide written consent before the University discloses personally identifiable information from the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

One exception which permits disclosure without a student’s prior written consent involves disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A “school official” is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted who performs an institutional service or function (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee; or a student employee assisting other school officials in performing their tasks.

School officials have a “legitimate educational interest” they need to review an education record in order to fulfill their professional responsibilities for the University.

The University may release without consent the following directory information: name, address, e-mail address, telephone numbers, major fields of study, date of birth, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of student-athletes, most-recent educational institution attended, number of current hours in which the student is enrolled, student enrollment status (i.e. full or part-time), degrees and graduation dates, anticipated degrees and graduation dates, classification (i.e. freshman, sophomore, etc.), awards and honors, dates of attendance, and class schedule, (this latter only by the Police Chief or a designee). Students wishing to withhold directory information must fill out a “Request to Prevent Disclosure of Directory Information” form, which may be obtained in the Registrar’s Office.

  1. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Montevallo to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

    Family Policy Compliance Office
    U.S. Department of Education
    600 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, D.C. 20202-4605

Any complaints or questions should be addressed to the Registrar, Registrar’s Office, Palmer Hall, (205) 665-6040, registrar@montevallo.edu. There is also a link to the University’s FERPA policy online at www.montevallo.edu/registrars-office/ferpa/.

Grade Appeals

The University of Montevallo respects the right and professional responsibility of faculty members to assign grades based on their professional judgment of student performance. 

This procedure is designed to provide students at the University of Montevallo with clear instructions for appealing the assigned grade for an individual assignment (individual grade) or a course (final grade) and is valid for undergraduate, graduate, on-campus, on-line, degree-seeking, temporary, dual enrollment, and enrichment students. 

This procedure does not apply to individual or final grades assigned as a result of an academic integrity incident. Instead, the student should follow the process outlined in the Academic Integrity Policy and procedure. 

Procedure to appeal a grade 

Students who believe that an assigned grade is unfair or incorrect should take the following steps: 

  1. The student must first confer with the faculty member involved to review their academic work and its assessment in an attempt to resolve issues informally. 

  1. If the student is not satisfied and wishes to continue the appeal, they will request a Grade Appeal Form from the chair of the department offering the course.  This form must be completed and submitted to the department chair within 10 business days of the date the student is notified of the individual grade or within 20 business days of the posting of the final grade. The form must be submitted with an attached written statement of the rationale/basis for the appeal and any supporting materials such as graded work, assignment instructions, and/or course syllabus.  The written appeal must state clearly the reason(s) for the appeal of the grade and the desired remedy. 

  1. The Department Chair will review the documents submitted by the student and will discuss the case with the faculty member who will be given a copy of the written appeal. Within five (5) business days of receiving the student’s appeal, the Chair will contact the student to schedule an appointment.  The Chair’s decision will be rendered at the conclusion of the conference with the student or within five (5) business days after the meeting. Note this may be delayed if the University is closed or during a semester or summer break. If the Department Chair supports the student’s appeal, the faculty member will be asked to reassess the student’s grade.   

  1.  If the Department Chair does not support the student’s appeal or the Department Chair does support the student’s appeal and the faculty member declines to change the student’s grade, the student may appeal to the dean of the college offering the course. At the student’s request, the Department Chair will send all materials to the college Dean, who, after discussion with the Chair and the faculty member, will schedule an appointment with the student.  The Dean may or may not request that the Chair and faculty member attend the conference.  The Dean will make a decision at the conclusion of the conference or within five (5) business days after the meeting. Note this may be delayed if the University is closed or during a semester or summer break. If the Dean supports the student’s appeal, the faculty member will be asked to reassess the student’s grade. The decision to change the grade will remain with the faculty member unless the Dean has clear, convincing, and objective evidence that the grade has not been calculated according to criteria communicated to students by the instructor.  

Other information 

Business Day - A business day is any day the administrative offices of the college are open for business.  

Timeliness - Every effort will be made to address complaints in a timely manner. However, students should be aware that action on complaints filed after the end of the semester or part of term, while the University is closed, or during a semester break may be delayed.  

Every attempt will be made to resolve appeals by the end of the semester in which they are filed for individual grades or by the beginning of the next semester for final grade appeals 

Relationship to the Academic Integrity Policy - If a student incurs an academic integrity violation and the student accepts the consequences (or the student’s appeal, if any, is rejected), then any grade penalty resulting from said violation cannot be used as a basis for any future grade appeals. In this situation, only grades that are not related to the student’s academic integrity violation are eligible for grade appeals. On the other hand, if a student’s appeal of an academic integrity violation is accepted, then any grade that had been impacted by the consequences of the academic integrity violation is again eligible for grade appeals. Note that student appeals of academic integrity violations can only be made within the time limits stated in the Academic Integrity policy. Also, students must appeal an academic integrity violation in a course, and the appeal must be resolved in the student’s favor, before the student may appeal any grades impacted by said violation. (See Academic Integrity Policy.) 

Transcript of Academic Record

The transcript is a student’s official permanent academic record. The University of Montevallo handles transcripts and the retention and disposal of student records in accordance with the guidelines of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers and the requirements of the Alabama University General Records Schedules.

Final grades for each term are reported to students through Banner Self Service. Currently enrolled students may obtain printed copies of their grade reports at no charge by submitting a request through Banner Self Service. Students who are not enrolled but who have fulfilled their financial obligations to the University may obtain their transcripts by requesting an official transcript through the Registrar’s Office webpage. Transcript fees apply.

Definitions (Undergraduate)

Bachelor’s Degree (B.A., BBA, BFA, B.M., B.S.)

An undergraduate award that normally requires the completion of an academic program of at least four but not more than five academic years of full-time equivalent college work. Bachelor’s degree programs require a minimum of 120 semester hours for completion of which at least 25% must be completed at the University.

Program of Instruction 

An organized set of courses and related activities for which, upon satisfactory completion, a degree or certificate is awarded.

Major Field of Study 

A primary area of an academic program consisting of a specified group of courses in a specialized academic study, discipline, or field. An undergraduate major field of study should include a minimum of 30 hours, either from a single field or an approved interdisciplinary study. Majors with concentration or track options must include a common core among the concentrations, typically equal to at least 50% of the major requirements. Typically, at least 50% of the hours required in the major program of study are at the 300 and/or 400 level. Majors may include an embedded undergraduate certificate.

Minor Field of Study 

A secondary area of a specialized academic study, discipline, or field usually consisting of 15-21 semester hours with except for a foreign language minor, which may consist of 12 hours at the upper level. Students may not declare the same major and minor. Additionally, departments may limit some majors from declaring minors that are non-exclusive in content: at least 50% of the hours required for the minor should be exclusive (not also applied to a major or another minor) with a significant number of hours at the 300/400 level. Minors may include an embedded undergraduate certificate.

Concentration

A specified group of courses within a major designed to give a student specific specialization knowledge within the major. Not all majors have concentrations. Some majors contain two or more concentrations from which a student must choose and formally declare. Concentrations are listed along with the program on the academic transcript. Majors with concentrations must include a common core, usually consisting of at least 50% of the major requirements.  Concentrations consist of at least 15 hours and may include an embedded undergraduate certificate.

Option, Focus, Track, or Emphasis

A specified group of courses within a major or concentration which is not formally declared by the student. These differ from concentrations in that they are an extension of the advising process and serve as recommendations, assisting students in choosing courses based on interest, occupation, or graduate school requirements. These curriculum items may include an embedded certificate.

Certificate, Undergraduate

A formal award certifying the satisfactory completion of a topically linked group of courses. Courses may be either from a single field or across disciplinary boundaries. Undergraduate certificates at the University are earned along with a degree-seeking program, often upon completing a prescribed minor course of study, and will require at least 12 semester hours of course work.

UM GPA

The cumulative institutional grade point average consisting of only those undergraduate GPA hours taken at the University of Montevallo.

Overall GPA

The cumulative grade point average consisting of all undergraduate GPA hours taken at the University of Montevallo and those accepted as transfer course work .